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Subject Areas

  1. Arts
  2. Buisness
  3. Citizenship
  4. Computing and IT
  5. Construction
  6. Design & Technology
  7. Engineering
  8. English & Literacy
  9. Food Technology
  10. French
  11. Geography
  12. German
  13. Government and Politics
  14. Hair and Beauty
  15. Health and Social Care
  16. History
  17. Maths
  18. PE
  19. PSHE
  20. Religious Studies
  21. Science
  22. Spanish

Our Vision

The teaching of the Arts at Murray Park is geared towards enabling each student to develop within their capabilities within a variety of arts based disciplines. 

We are continually aiming to raise the standards of achievement of the students at Murray Park, though the choice of the correct KS4 courses. 

In January 2019 we took the majority of Year 9 for day trip to Liverpool in support of our current "Beatles/60s" project and during March we are running our Arts Trip to New York City to visit various museums and art galleries. We are currently discussing our next rang out of school experiences for 2020.

The Department

The Arts department consists of 4 full-time and (currently) 2 part-time teachers. We have a wide variety of experience in the Arts, delivering a range of subjects (Art, Textiles, Photography, Music and Drama) and there is a strong team spirit in the department. We are passionate about our individual subjects and our dedicated and determined approach continues to produce excellent outcomes for students.

The department comprises of the following rooms:

  • Two art rooms
  • Textiles room
  • Two music rooms
  • Photography studio with ICT provision
  • Drama studio with light gantry, office and control room
  • From September the departmental accommodation will increase to include more rooms/suites and a second Drama space including drapes and stage lighting.

KS3 Curriculum

In the KS3 all students have one lesson per week in Art, Music and Drama. in addition, during Year 9 students can also opt to follow Photography or Textiles. At KS4 students can opt to follow courses in the same disciplines. 

All KS3 courses have assessments based on the relevant KS4 exam syllabus and all teaching is directed at students acquiring and building upon skills that can be used at Key Stage 4.

Year 7 projects include:

  • Art – Shoe ‘baseline test’ project, Aboriginal art, Portraits, Formal elements
  • Textiles – Portraits
  • Music – Find a voice, Musical Instruments, Notation & Graphic Notation, Ostinato & Variations, BBC 10 & orchestra, Pop Music and songwriting
  • Drama – Bullying, Circus, Text, Character, Tinsel Truths

Year 8 projects include:

  • Art – Insect art, Totem poles, Graffiti Art
  • Textiles – Insect project
  • Music – Film music, Folk music, Blues, Reggae, parody, Pop riffs and melodies
  • Drama – Slapstick, Pantomime, Peer pressure, Script, Battle cries

Year 9 projects include:

  • Art – Day of the dead, 1960s music/The Beatles, Body decoration
  • Textiles  - Good Enough to Eat, Celebrity Portraits, 1960s/The Beatles Shift Dress, GSCE Skills Workshops
  • Music – Band project, Songwriting, The Beatles, Dance Music, Rap, Festivals
  • Drama – Commedia, Departure, Secret annexe, Shakespeare, Pop culture, Performance

Towards the end of Year 8, pupils can choose one subject to study in depth during the entirety of Year 9. This will increase their depth of knowledge and improve their skills ready to embark on the same subject at GCSE.

Choices for 2018/19 include: Engineering, Food Preparation & Nutrition, Photography and Textiles.

KS4 Curriculum

We currently several subjects at KS4 which demonstrate a wide breadth of choice within the department.

  • AQA GCSE Art & Design – Art, Craft & Design
  • AQA GCSE Art & Design – Textiles
  • AQA GCSE Art & Design – Photography
  • EDUQAS GCSE Music
  • EDUQAS GCSE Drama

Extra-Curricular activities

We aim to supplement our broad curriculum with a range of extra-curricular activities to enrich pupils experience and enjoyment of learning.

  • Lunchtime and after school Art clubs
  • Lunchtime and after school Music clubs
  • At KS4, pupils are encouraged to attend the ‘Commit to Six’ after school lessons in the Arts Department on Monday’s and Thursday’s respectively for one hour. These lessons gives the pupils the perfect opportunity to gain additional teacher support in relation to their course.

 

Key Stage 4 - Business

Curriculum Overview

Edexcel 9-1 GCSE Business

In Business we provide students with essential skills and knowledge to prepare them for the next step in their lives, be that further education, training or work. We provide a broad and accessible curriculum with engaging, knowledge-rich subject.

Business naturally lends itself to supporting students in their other studies in school, including many links to numeracy and literacy.  Our curriculum has been developed to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate creativity, zest as well as independence through project work.  

Students develop analytical and evaluative skills throughout the business course which not only prepare them to be highly successful in GCSE Business, but also in the wider world by being able to make justified decisions. Students gain a strong working knowledge of how businesses operate for running, or working within one in the future.

The GCSE course consists of:

Theme 1 – Studied in Year 10 - Assessed by written examination at the end of Year 11

  • Enterprise and entrepreneurship
  • Market Research
  • Market Segmentation
  • Finance for Business
  • The Marketing Mix
  • Business Location
  • Business plans
  • Sources of Finance
  • The economy

Theme 2 – Studied in Year 11 – Assessed by written examination at the end of Year 11

  • Business ethics
  • Aims and objectives
  • Product
  • Place
  • Pricing
  • Promotion
  • Advanced Finance for Business
  • Leadership
  • Recruitment
 

Year 10 – Theme 1

Year 11 – Theme 2

Autumn Term

  • Why and how new business ideas come about.
  • The impact of risk and reward on business activity.
  • The role of business enterprise and entrepreneurship.
  • Market research
  • Market mapping
  • Market segmentation
  • Understanding the competitive environment
  • Changing aims and objectives
  • The design mix
  • Pricing strategies for products 
  • Promotion strategies and the use of technology
  • Methods of distribution
  • Production methods
  • Stock management
  • Quality
  • The sales process

Spring Term

  • Aims and objectives
  • Revenue and cost calculations
  • Breakeven calculations
  • The importance of cash to a business
  • Cash-flow forecasting
  • Sources of finance
  • Business ownership structures
  • Location
  • Marketing mix
  • Business plans
  • Gross profit and net profit calculations
  • Profit margin calculations
  • Average rate of return calculations
  • Interpreting business data
  • Organisational structures
  • Communication
  • Job roles and responsibilities
  • Recruitment
  • Motivation and leadership
  • Training and developing employees

Summer Term

  • Stakeholders
  • Technology and the impact on business
  • Legislation and the impact on business
  • Economic climate and the impact on business
  • External factors and the impact on business
  • Revision of theme 1
  • Mock paper – Theme 1
  • Methods of growth for businesses
  • Globalisation
  • International trade

Revision of theme 1 and theme 2 to prepare for external examinations in May and June.

 

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 3:  Citizenship

Curriculum Intent

A high-quality citizenship education helps to provide pupils with knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society. In particular, citizenship education should foster pupils’ keen awareness and understanding of democracy, government and how laws are made and upheld. Citizenship should equip pupils with the skills and knowledge to explore political and social issues critically, to weigh evidence, debate and make reasoned arguments. It should also prepare pupils to take their place in society as responsible citizens, manage their money well and make sound financial decisions.

Curriculum overview

  • acquire a sound knowledge and understanding of how the United Kingdom is governed, its political system and how citizens participate actively in its democratic systems of government
  • develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the role of law and the justice system in our society and how laws are shaped and enforced
  • develop an interest in, and commitment to, participation in volunteering as well as other forms of responsible activity, that they will take with them into adulthood
  • equip pupils with the skills to think critically and debate political questions, to enable them to manage their money on a day-to-day basis, and plan for future financial needs.

Key stage 3

Citizenship should develop pupils’ understanding of democracy, government and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Pupils should use and apply their knowledge and understanding whilst developing skills to research and interrogate evidence, debate and evaluate viewpoints, present reasoned arguments and take informed action.

Pupils will be taught about:  the development of the political system of democratic government in the United Kingdom, including the roles of citizens, Parliament and the monarch

  • the operation of Parliament, including voting and elections, and the role of political parties
  • the precious liberties enjoyed by the citizens of the United Kingdom
  • the nature of rules and laws and the justice system, including the role of the police and the operation of courts and tribunals
  • the roles played by public institutions and voluntary groups in society, and the ways in which citizens work together to improve their communities, including opportunities to participate in school-based activities
  • the functions and uses of money, the importance and practice of budgeting, and managing risk.

 

Topics

Year 7

  • What is citizenship?
  • What is parliament and how does it work?
  • What do MPs do?
  • British values and democracy
  • Local community and multiculturalism
  • Local government
  • Community action volunteering

Year 8

  • What does it mean to be British?
  • Where do our rights come from?
  • How have women’s rights changed over time?
  • Human rights and the UN
  • Human rights, refugees and migration
  • Religious prejudice and discrimination
  • Religious tolerance
  • Extremism
  • How can we prevent radicalisation and extremism
  • Mutual respect

Year 9

  • Democracy in Britain
  • Political parties and political views
  • The constitution
  • The role of the monarchy
  • The rule of law
  • The youth justice system
  • Brexit
  • Britain and the commonwealth

Extra-curricular activities

The department also uses drop down days and external visitors to support the programme of study.

 

Key Stage 4:  Citizenship

Curriculum Intent

A high-quality citizenship education helps to provide pupils with knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society. In particular, citizenship education should foster pupils’ keen awareness and understanding of democracy, government and how laws are made and upheld. Teaching should equip pupils with the skills and knowledge to explore political and social issues critically, to weigh evidence, debate and make reasoned arguments. It should also prepare pupils to take their place in society as responsible citizens, manage their money well and make sound financial decisions.

 Aims:

  • acquire a sound knowledge and understanding of how the United Kingdom is governed, its political system and how citizens participate actively in its democratic systems of government
  • develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the role of law and the justice system in our society and how laws are shaped and enforced
  • develop an interest in, and commitment to, participation in volunteering as well as other forms of responsible activity, that they will take with them into adulthood
  • Equip pupils with the skills to think critically and debate political questions, to enable them to manage their money on a day-to-day basis, and plan for future financial needs.

Curriculum overview

Key stage 4

Citizenship should build on the key stage 3 programme of study to deepen pupils’ understanding of democracy, government and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Pupils should develop their skills to be able to use a range of research strategies, weigh up evidence, make persuasive arguments and substantiate their conclusions. They should experience and evaluate different ways that citizens can act together to solve problems and contribute to society.

Pupils should be taught about:

  • parliamentary democracy and the key elements of the constitution of the United Kingdom, including the power of government, the role of citizens and Parliament in holding those in power to account, and the different roles of the executive, legislature and judiciary and a free press
  • the different electoral systems used in and beyond the United Kingdom and actions citizens can take in democratic and electoral processes to influence decisions locally, nationally and beyond
  • other systems and forms of government, both democratic and non-democratic, beyond the United Kingdom Citizenship – key stages 3 and 4 3
  • local, regional and international governance and the United Kingdom’s relations with the rest of Europe, the Commonwealth, the United Nations and the wider world
  • human rights and international law
  • the legal system in the UK, different sources of law and how the law helps society deal with complex problems
  • diverse national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and the need for mutual respect and understanding
  • the different ways in which a citizen can contribute to the improvement of his or her community, to include the opportunity to participate actively in community volunteering, as well as other forms of responsible activity
  • income and expenditure, credit and debt, insurance, savings and pensions, financial products and services, and how public money is raised and spent.

The pupils study a range of topics including:

 

Topics

Year 10

  • Principles and values in British society today
  • Identities
  • The UK and identity
  • Values in a democratic and diverse society
  • The rights, responsibilities and role of the media
  • Press regulations and censorship
  • The role of the UK within key international organisations
  • The UK and the EU
  • International disputes and conflicts
  • Making a difference in society

Year 11

  • Law and contemporary society
  • Rules and law
  • Rights and responsibilities within the legal system
  • Rights and entitlements of citizens at differing ages
  • How laws protect citizens and deal with criminals
  • Criminality in the UK today
  • Universal human rights

Extra-curricular activities

Drop down day and external visitors are used to support the teaching of this subject.

Key Stage 3: Computing

Curriculum Intent

Computers are a part of everyday life and technology is becoming more essential to our lives at home and at work. We are committed in making sure that pupils learn the skills that will enable them to be ready for the workplace and to be able to participate effectively and safely in the digital world.

The Computing and Business curriculum has been developed to equip young people with the skills, knowledge and understanding of computers and the business world so that they will be able to use the skills taught in their future lives.

Computing and business also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through the use of this medium.

We aim to:

  • Increase pupils’ confidence in using computers and develop their understanding of the business world and its practices.
  • Create an engaging curriculum that encourages pupils to want to learn more about computers and business.
  • Encourage pupils to make use of computational thinking and problem solving abilities.
  • To educate pupils on using the internet safely
  • Encourage the use of both numeracy and literacy within their projects.

We are continually aiming to raise the standards of achievement for the pupils at Murray Park.

Curriculum Overview

All pupils in KS3 follow the National Curriculum.  The yearly teaching programmes for Years 7 to 9 are organized in to six main strands that are linked to the National Curriculum. The areas covered are:

Computational Thinking 

Programming

Data representation

Computers

Networking

Information Technology

Below is an outline of what students will be studying during their time at Murray Park School throughout Key Stage 3:

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Autumn Term

Introduction to the network and go4schools.

E- Safety, Using computers, emails and the internet safely.

Hardware, software and how computers communicate.

Introduction to Computing theory and Ubiquitous computing.

 

Databases – Sorting, filtering and searching data – creation of forms, macros and queries. Using Boolean search terms AND, OR & NOT.

Advanced spreadsheets and modelling – Use of macros, advanced formulae, functions, graphs.

 

Python programing – Advanced level programming following a textual based programming language – Understanding Strings, variables algorithms, loops, arrays, functions and procedures.

 

Spring Term

Introducing spreadsheets – what spreadsheet modelling is and how to use it.

 

Introduction to programming using Kodu software.

Computational thinking with Game Maker - Medium level programming and sequencing.

 

Laws of IT – using computers ethically and appropriately.

Cyber Security – Understanding internal and external threats to data including viruses, Trojans, botnets, rootkits and social engineering and physical threats.  

 

Impacts on IT in society - Understanding ethical issues with IT, It and disability, IT and the environment.

Summer Term

Graphics types with Photoshop and Data representation – How images and data are stored through binary digits.

 

End of Year assessment with recap on key and common elements.

Cloud computing and cloud storage – Computer science theory.

 

Communication and networks – Topologies, packet switching and how computers communicate through the internet.  

User interfaces and combining multiple applications across a range of devices.

 

Digital Logic - Logic gates, Binary (recap), Decimal, Hexadecimal ASCII conversion.

 

 

Key Stage 4: Digital Information Technology

Curriculum Intent

Computers are a part of everyday life and technology is becoming more essential to our lives at home and at work. We are committed in making sure that pupils learn the skills that will enable them to be ready for the workplace and to be able to participate effectively and safely in the digital world.

The Computing and Business curriculum has been developed to equip young people with the skills, knowledge and understanding of computers and the business world so that they will be able to use the skills taught in their future lives.

Computing and business also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through the use of this medium.

We aim to:

  • Increase pupil’s confidence in using computers and develop their understanding of the business world and its practices.
  • Create an engaging curriculum that encourages pupils to want to learn more about computers and business.
  • Encourage pupils to make use of computational thinking and problem solving abilities.
  • To educate pupils on using the internet safely
  • Encourage the use of both numeracy and literacy within their projects.

We are continually aiming to raise the standards of achievement for the pupils at Murray Park.

BTEC First award Level 1 / 2 Tech Award in Digital Information Technology

The Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Digital Information Technology is for pupils who wish to acquire knowledge and technical skills through vocational contexts by studying the knowledge, understanding and skills related to data management, data interpretation, data presentation and data protection as part of their Key Stage 4 learning. This builds on the learning that has already taken place at Key Stage 3.

The Award gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The Award complements learning in GCSE programmes, such as the GCSE in Computer Science, by broadening experience and skills participation in different type of activities. It gives learners the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills practically through project work, such as planning and designing a user interface and developing a dashboard to interpret trends in data.

This award consists of the following components:

Component 1- This is an internal assessment that contains 3 learning aims and is worth 30% of the final marks. For each learning aim pupils will need to complete an assignment.

  • Learning Aim A- Investigate user interface design for individuals and organisations
  • Learning Aim B - Use project planning techniques to plan and design a user interface
  • Learning Aim C - Develop and review a user interface

Component 2 - This is an internal assessment that contains 3 learning aims and is worth 30% of the final marks. For each learning aim pupils will need to complete an assignment.

  • Learning Aim A - Investigate the role and impact of using data on individuals and organisations
  • Learning Aim B - Create a dashboard using data manipulation tools
  • Learning Aim C - Draw conclusions and review data presentation methods

Component 3 - This is an external examination that is worth 40% of pupil’s final marks. There are four learning aims that pupils will cover, they are:

  • Learning Aim A – Modern Technologies
  • Learning Aim B – Cyber Security
  • Learning Aim C – Implications of the digital system
  • Learning Aim D – Planning and communication

An outline of what students will study during their time at Murray Park School throughout Key Stage 4 computing is set out in the table below:

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Component 1  -

 

What is an interface

Audience needs

Design principles

Designing an efficient user interface.

Project planning techniques

Creating a project plan

Creating an initial design

Develop a user Interface

Refine a user interface

Evaluation

Component 3 continued - 

Threats to digital systems

Prevention and management of threats of data

Policies and laws

Responsible use

threats of data

Policies and laws

 

Spring Term

Component 2  -

Characteristic of data

Representing data

Ensuring data is suitable for processing

Data collection

Quality of information and impacts

Sectors that use modelling

Threats to individuals

 

Component 3 continued -

Legal and ethical use

Forms of notation

 

Revision sessions for external examination

Summer Term

Component 2 continued  - Data processing methods

Producing a dashboard

Drawing conclusions based on data

How presentation affects data

 

Component 3  -

Modern technologies

Impacts of modern technologies

 

Resit for examinations

 

Key Stage 4: Construction

Curriculum Intent

The construction curriculum provides a comprehensive skills base and a sound understanding of key industrial practices for students with a keen interest in practical work in order to prepare them for a potential career in the diverse construction industry. We partner with Derby College to ensure that students have access to specialist facilities and high quality technical expertise from experienced and skilled staff.

Students complete units of study across a range of construction trade specialisms to give them a broad repertoire of skills to emerge as capable craftspeople, and alongside this develop their knowledge of key topics such as health and safety and the planning and management of construction work, leaving them able to make immediate progress into the industry should they wish to upon leaving Murray Park.

Curriculum overview

WJEC Level 1 and 2 Award in Constructing the Built Environment

Unit 1- Safety and Security in Construction- 25%

Unit 2- Practical Construction Skills- 50%

Unit 3- Planning Construction Projects- 25%

In Year 10 spend one hour per week studying the examined aspect of the course, focussed upon health and safety practices in the construction industry, as well as spending one afternoon at Derby College, completing the initial practical units of the course. At the end of Year 10, students sit the Unit 1 exam.

Throughout Year 11 students continue practical elements to complete Unit 2, which is followed by the project based assessment for Unit 3 which requires them to demonstrate their construction planning skills, working within a given context.

https://www.goconstruct.org/construction-careers/browse-all-job-roles/

https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/constructing-the-built-environment-level-1-2/#tab_overview

Year 10 Year 11
Autumn Term Unit 2 – Brickwork / Painting & Decorating / Plumbing Unit 2 - Brickwork / Painting & Decorating / Plumbing
Spring Term

Unit 1 – Health & Safety exam preparation

Unit 2 – Brickwork / Painting & Decorating / Plumbing

Unit 3 – Planning construction projects
- Job roles within construction
- understanding how construction projects are realised
- plan a construction project
Summer Term

Unit 1 – Health & Safety exam preparation

Unit 2 - Brickwork / Painting & Decorating / Plumbing

Unit 3- Final exam preparation

*NB- College groups work on a rotation so exact sequence of Unit 2 specialisms depends on groupings

Extra-curricular activities

Practical sessions are run at Derby College- classes finish at 4pm.

Key Stage 3:  Design and Technology

The Engineering and Design Team at Murray Park are committed and enthused experts in their respective fields, bringing a wealth of knowledge and experience from industry into the classroom. We strive to equip pupils with the skills and qualifications to go on and become the next generation of creative and skilled practitioners in their chosen field. Our mission is to build confidence and encourage pupils to become independent and resilient learners.

Our curriculum is designed to install a love of learning, making links to industry and developing major cross-curricular skills which are important in other subject areas beyond our own. Learning is well balanced between the development of practical and academic skills providing a rich and informative mix of engaging and purposeful lessons.

Curriculum overview

Pupils in Years 7-9 will study a range of Design & Technology subjects on a 7/8 week rotation so that they develop a wide foundation of knowledge and skills from specialist teachers. The Design and Technology programme of study gives pupils the capability to apply creativity and innovation along with an appreciation of the impact that changing technology has upon society, leaving them able to take a confident, informed approach to design challenges in both local and industrial contexts.

In Food Technology students learn a wide range of challenging food preparation skills to make high quality dishes, underpinned by a knowledge of nutrition and ingredients required to lead a healthy lifestyle, or progress in the food industry.

Pupils in Years 7-9 will study a range of Design & Technology subjects on a 7/8 week rotation so that they develop a wide foundation of knowledge and skills from specialist teachers. The Design and Technology programme of study gives pupils the capability to apply creativity and innovation along with an appreciation of the impact that changing technology has upon society, leaving them able to take a confident, informed approach to design challenges in both local and industrial contexts.

In Food Technology students learn a wide range of challenging food preparation skills to make high quality dishes, underpinned by a knowledge of nutrition and ingredients required to lead a healthy lifestyle, or progress in the food industry.

www.technologystudent.com

www.howstuffworks.com

https://www.foodafactoflife.org.uk/

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Annual rotation- 7/8 week projects

Engineering - Phone holder

Design and Technology- Design principles

Technology- Computer aided design and manufacture

Food Technology – The Eatwell Guide and development of practical skills

Textiles - Skills building

Engineering – Bottle Opener

Design and Technology- Amplifier

Technology- Pewter cast key-ring

Food Technology – Food provenance

Textiles - Maps

Engineering - Phone holder

Design and Technology- Celebrating achievement

Technology- Mechanical sweet dispenser

Food Technology – Food science

Textiles – Advanced Techniques

Extra-curricular activities

The Design and Technology Department runs the Formula 1 in Schools programme for Year 8 students.

 

Key Stage 4:  Design and Technology

Curriculum Intent

In Design and Technology students combine practical and technological skills with creative thinking to design and make products that meet human needs. They learn to use current technologies and consider the impact of future technological developments. They also learn to think creatively and solve real life problems to improve the life of others in society by becoming entrepreneurs.

Working with stimulating contexts that provide a range of creative opportunities, are drawn from local communities and cultures resulting in students identifying the needs and wants of others. They respond with creative ideas and products which consider aesthetic, ergonomic, cultural, social, economic, industrial and environmental issues. As the do so, they evaluate present and past design and its impact on 21st century design.

Through Design and Technology, students develop confidence in using practical skills and becoming critical and more informed users of products. They apply creative thinking and learn to innovate.

Curriculum overview

AQA GCSE Design and Technology

  • Core Technical Principles
  • Specialist Technical Principles
  • Designing and Making Principles

Exam- 50%

Non-Examined Assessment- 50%

All course content covered in both exam and NEA.

Throughout Year 10 students are guided through a range of designing and making assignments and theory lessons to allow them to develop the skills and knowledge required to become informed, confident and proficient designers, equipped with the broad range of skills required to realise their designs in a specialist materials category (wood and timber).

In Year 11 students are largely occupied with completing their non-examined assessment task, whilst also gaining knowledge and understanding in preparation for their final exam.

https://www.technologystudent.com/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/examspecs/zby2bdm

https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/design-and-technology/gcse/design-and-technology-8552

http://mr-dt.com/default.htm

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Timber based materials

- Storage unit

 

Polymers- Covid face mask ear protectors

 

Research principles

- identifying design possibilities

- primary & secondary research

NEA  (coursework)

Spring Term

Design principles

- design techniques

- Developing a design

 

Making principles

- making a prototype

- Evaluating skills

NEA  (coursework) February half term

 

Exam  preparation

Summer Term

Start NEA  (coursework)

Exam  preparation

Extra-curricular activities

The Department provides one hour a week, Commit to Six support sessions in the summer term of Year 10 and throughout Year 11.

Key Stage 4: Engineering

Curriculum Intent

The engineering curriculum has been designed to prepare students to participate in tomorrow’s rapidly changing industrial world. We aim to link learning with our local engineering businesses bringing a real life view to their work. Students will gain the opportunity to visit industrial factories and engage in presentations/in-school activities ran by leading local professionals in the field of Engineering. Therefore, this curriculum provides that firm grounding for students to be able to pursue a career Engineering.

Students develop their understanding of the process of realising functional products from interpreting engineering drawings, planning for its production and reviewing its quality and sustainability. Students will learn, and have the opportunity apply fundamental engineering principles so that they can work independently through a manufacturing process. It is our aim to develop and build on this knowledge and these skills throughout KS3 so that students are ready to demonstrate successfully their learning during GCSE controlled assessments. They will gain experiences of using a wide range of manual and CNC equipment giving them a solid foundation of knowledge for life after Murray Park.

Curriculum overview

OCR Cambridge National- Engineering Manufacture

R109- Engineering Materials, Processes and Production- 25%

R110- Preparing and Planning for Manufacture- 25%

R111- Computer Aided Manufacturing- 25%

R112- Quality Control of Engineered Products- 25%

In Year 10 students are taught the key principles of engineering manufacture, such as reading technical drawings, the use of quality control measures such as tolerances and planning tasks in detail prior to developing practical skills using standard hand and machine tools. Following this students complete R110, for which they will plan and manufacture and given product before moving on to Unit R111, which gives them the opportunity to learn how to set up and operate computer controlled production machinery in detail. Throughout both of these units, students gain key knowledge required for Unit R109, the examined aspect of the course, which develops a comprehensive understanding of engineering materials, manufacturing techniques and industrial processes.

In Year 11 students continue to learn key technical information in preparation for The Unit R109 exam, which is taken in the January of Year 11. Finally students complete Unit R112 in which they learn how quality is controlled and ensured in industrial settings.

https://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/cambridge-nationals/engineering-manufacture-level-1-2-award-certificate-j832-j842/

https://www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/

https://www.technologystudent.com/

Year 10 Year 11
Autumn Term G-Clamp project
-Interpreting engineering drawings
- Production planning
- Making
- Quality control review
- Planning to make 1000 (Batch production)
R109 exam preparation
Topics will include:
- Engineering materials
- Properties of engineering materials
- Fabrication techniques
- CNC machining
- Automation
- Global manufacturing
Spring Term R110 Coursework assessment
(Manual operations)
- Drill Gauge
CNC Skills- Acrylic Rule
R112 coursework preparation and assessment
- Quality control techniques and applications in engineering
Summer Term R111 coursework
(CNC manufacture)
- Drill Gauge production using a Laser Cutter
R112 coursework completion

Extra-curricular activities

The Department provides one hour a week, Commit to Six support sessions in the summer term of Year 10 and throughout Year 11.

Key Stage 3: English

Curriculum Intent

In English at Murray Park, students cover a wide range of inspiring topics all designed to prepare them effectively for their GCSE examinations in Language and Literature. From creative writing to Shakespeare to poetry to grammar, students are exposed to different texts, viewpoints and writers across the five years.

Our curriculum is designed with National Curriculum requirements embedded, but also with our students in mind. We aim to intrigue them, to amaze them; we choose our topics very carefully so that students enjoy their learning and are also challenged. Core skills in writing, reading and spoken language are embedded so that students feel confident with different types of text and are able to express themselves with imagination and accuracy.

When devising the English curriculum, we look to augment students’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development: topics and texts are chosen with a view on developing these, exploring our rich literary heritage, from Romantic poetry up to pre-1914 texts all the way to the latest fiction and non-fiction. In addition, we are able to welcome visitors such as the Young Shakespeare Company and professional writers on a regular basis to build upon our work in school.

Every year seeks to build on the last; every topic seeks to develop but also recap skills learnt previously. We are passionate about English and hope to instil a passion in all of our students as well.

Curriculum Overview

Year 7

In Year 7, students examine a range of topics that mainly link to literary fiction. Students begin by looking at characterisation in the form of our ‘Heroes and Villains’ scheme of learning. Students then read their class reader for the year. Staff choose novels, which include ‘Coraline,’ ‘Private Peaceful’ and ‘War Horse,’ carefully to fully engage their classes. As well as reading the novels together as a class, students examine how writers structure and use language within the texts to affect their reader. They are then introduced to writing poetry and the works of Shakespeare, with a visit from the Young Shakespeare Company thrown in for good measure. Towards the end of the year, Year 7 read and compare several texts around the themes of ‘identity’ in order to make them consider who exactly they are and how they see the world. The year is completed by examining the skills involved in narrative writing.

Every week, Year 7 students also visit the library to have a reading lesson: the school has invested heavily in the Accelerated Reader scheme, designed to promote reading for pleasure and help students to do so. Fortnightly, students also have a Writing Masterclass. The aim of these is to retain a focus on writing skills throughout the entire year, be it using a wider vocabulary, punctuating correctly or simply freewriting for the pleasure of it.

Year 8

 In Year 8, students largely study non-fiction texts and look at how to write non-fiction-style pieces. Having said that, they start the year by enjoying a class novel, developing the language and structural analysis skills established in Year 7. Novels include options such as ‘Holes’ and ‘Solace of the Road’ and are chosen for their engaging plots and characters as well as their literary value. Having been introduced to poetry in Year 7, Year 8 students move onto analysing poetry that is centred around a theme of ‘Love, Relationships and Conflict.’ Poems such as ‘Symptoms’ and ‘Sonnet 18’ are explored, starting students on a long road that leads them to poetry analysis at GCSE. A scheme of learning focusing on Shakespearean themes such as racism and abuse of power follows, using non-fiction texts to identify issues and views. The next step is to develop how they write their own views, which is what students do next. Towards the end of Year 8, classes produce their own anthologies of poetry before returning to non-fiction in the form of our ‘World of Work’ topic, designed to expose them to a range of future possibilities by learning from the past and the present.

Our Accelerated Reader scheme continues for Year 8 students. In addition, they also have a Writing Masterclass once every two weeks.

Year 9

 In Year 9, the English department look to raise the level of challenge even further to aid the progression into Key Stage 4. That being said, what we have not sought to do is to have a three-year Key Stage 4. We feel strongly that it would not be appropriate and want to start to embed the skills free from the language of GCSE and examinations, allowing students to feel comfortable with the kinds of things that they will be asked to do in the future.

After continuing the trend of starting with a novel (options include A Christmas Carol and Of Mice and Men), students imagine both a utopian and dystopian future with a creative writing scheme of learning. After Christmas, they move onto examining a Shakespearean text, resuming where they left off in Year 7. A selection of poems is the next course of their literary banquet, along with the skills needed to write a developed analysis of such texts. Towards the end of the year, Year 9 students return to creative writing but this time with a gothic slant, as well as answering the AQA Year 9 assessment papers to signal the end of their Key Stage 3 studies.

Although Year 9 are not part of the Accelerated Reader programme, they do visit the library once a fortnight to read for pleasure, as well as having fortnightly Writing Masterclasses.

An outline of what students will study during their time at Murray Park throughout Key Stage 3 is set out in the table below:

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Autumn Term

Heroes and Villains

The Novel

The Novel

Love, Relationships and Conflict

The Novel

Creative Writing: The Future

Spring Term

Introduction to Shakespeare

Introduction to Poetry

The Themes of Shakespeare

Writing From a Viewpoint

Romeo and Juliet

Poetry

Summer Term

Identity

Narrative Writing

Producing Poetry

The World of Work

AQA Year 9 Assessments

Creative Writing: The Gothic

Extra-Curricular Activities

  • A school newspaper
  • Library activities run by Mrs Makasis designed to inspire a love of reading
  • Morning intervention sessions, mainly for Year 11 students
  • ‘Commit to Six’ sessions, primarily aimed at Year 11 students
  • ‘Twilight’ intervention sessions, where students work intensively on their English studies until around 7pm but are compensated in the form of pizza and fizzy drinks!

 

 

Key Stage 4: English

Curriculum Intent

In English at Murray Park, students cover a wide range of inspiring topics all designed to prepare them effectively for their GCSE examinations in Language and Literature. From creative writing to Shakespeare to poetry to grammar, students are exposed to different texts, viewpoints and writers across the five years.

Our curriculum is designed with National Curriculum requirements embedded, but also with our students in mind. We aim to intrigue them, to amaze them; we choose our topics very carefully so that students enjoy their learning and are also challenged. Core skills in writing, reading and spoken language are embedded so that students feel confident with different types of text and are able to express themselves with imagination and accuracy.

When devising the English curriculum, we look to augment students’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development: topics and texts are chosen with a view on developing these, exploring our rich literary heritage, from Romantic poetry up to pre-1914 texts all the way to the latest fiction and non-fiction. In addition, we are able to welcome visitors such as the Young Shakespeare Company and professional writers on a regular basis to build upon our work in school.

Every year seeks to build on the last; every topic seeks to develop but also recap skills learnt previously. We are passionate about English and hope to instil a passion in all of our students as well.

Curriculum overview

Key Stage 4 at Murray Park is split: in Year 10, students read and explore their GCSE English Literature texts. As a staff, we have chosen The Strange Case of Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde,’ ‘An Inspector Calls,’ the AQA Power and Conflict anthology poetry and Macbeth. These are all chosen to capitalise on staff expertise as well as for their accessibility and captivating ideas and themes. Since the Literature content is so extensive, we felt it best to dedicate a whole year to trying to master these novellas, plays and poems. Content covered in Year 9 is designed to ensure a smooth transition into Year 10, which culminates in a Literature mock exam in the final summer half-term.

In Year 11, students start by looking intensively at the skills needed for the two English Language GCSE papers. Building on what they have studied in Key Stage 3, students work on how to approach these questions up until their Language mock examination in November. Following these results, the rest of Year 11 is dedicated to revising and developing exam skills so that students can perform to their absolute best in their GCSE examinations. A third and final mock, covering both Language and Literature, comes around February, with staff using data to plan for how best to lose any gaps in knowledge that their students have. A visit from the Young Shakespeare Company helps revision, as do regular ‘Commit to Six’ sessions after school.

Both Year 10 and 11 have fortnightly Writing Masterclass lessons, again designed to keep developing their writing skills whatever the topic.

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Jekyll and Hyde

Macbeth

English Language

Revision of Paper 1 English Literature content

Spring Term

An Inspector Calls

Power and Conflict Poetry

Revision of English Language and English Literature

Mock Examinations

Summer Term

Unseen Poetry

Literature Revision

Mock Examinations

Unseen Poetry

Revision of English Language and English Literature

Extra-curricular activities

  • A school newspaper
  • Library activities run by Mrs Makasis designed to inspire a love of reading
  • Morning intervention sessions, mainly for Year 11 students
  • ‘Commit to Six’ sessions, primarily aimed at Year 11 students
  • ‘Twilight’ intervention sessions, where students work intensively on their English studies until around 7pm but are compensated in the form of pizza and fizzy drinks!

Key Stage 4: Food Preparation and Nutrition

Curriculum Intent

The food technology department offer learners the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding of food preparation and nutrition. The practical and theoretical skills learners will acquire throughout the curriculum will empower them to work confidently, independently and develop valuable life skills. Learners will become self-sufficient young adults with a contextual understanding of current diet related health issues within society. The subject also provides therapeutic benefits to the learners as the opportunity to design and create their own dishes can nurture their creativity and give them a sense of accomplishment.

Curriculum overview

AQA GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

NEA 1- Food Investigation- 15%

NEA 2- Food Preparation- 35%

Exam- 50%

Throughout Year 10 students complete a range of practical assignments and menu planning projects focussed on the key skills of research and analysis in order to meet the needs of specific consumers. This is followed with a unit covering the scientific aspect of food preparation and the effects of different combinations of ingredients and cooking techniques upon the composition of prepared foods. Year 10 concludes with a mock exam to develop the students’ exam technique.

In Year 11 students are largely focussed upon completing the non-examined assessment tasks that form part of the final grade they are awarded. In addition to this students complete a comprehensive programme of revision in order to prepare for the final exam.

https://www.foodafactoflife.org.uk/

https://www.ifst.org/lovefoodlovescience

https://www.bbc.co.uk/food

Year 10 Year 11
Autumn Term Nutrition- Macro and Micro Nutrients NEA 1- Food Science Investigation
Spring Term Menu Planning- Consumer Requirements
Food Science- Transforming Ingredients
NEA 2- Food Preparation
Summer Term Menu Planning- Cuisines and Occasions Exam Preparation

Extra-curricular activities

The Department provides one hour a week, Commit to Six support sessions in the summer term of Year 10 and throughout Year 11.

Key Stage 3: French

Curriculum Intent

MFL teaching at Murray Park School aims to prepare pupils for the globalised world in which we live. Pupils will be given opportunities to develop their skills in understanding and responding to spoken and written texts; converse in the target language with fluency and accuracy; produce written texts designed for various purposes; use grammatical knowledge to manipulate language effectively; and increase their understanding of other cultures. It is hoped that our pupils will enter leave school with broadened horizons and opportunities that may not have been available to previous generations of their family.

In addition to these aims, which reflect the National Curriculum and GCSE exam specifications, French teachers are keen to be at the forefront of cross-curricular learning across the school, as well as in the areas of literacy, numeracy, SMSC and ICT.

The scheme of learning in MFL is planned to ensure that each module covers content from all three GCSE themes, ensuring that pupils are used to re-using vocabulary and structures in a range of contexts and become accustomed from the outset to the idea that authentic sources and conversation do not fit neatly into categories. Key Stage 3 (KS3) and GCSE vocabulary and structures have been sequenced throughout the five years to ensure that pupils regularly re-use vocabulary and deepen their knowledge of each theme. For example, pupils describe their personality in year 7 modules 1 and 3, before revisiting it with more complex vocabulary in year 9 module 1 in the context of how you get on with family and friends.

In KS3, end of module assessments have been rewritten to adequately prepare pupils for Key Stage 4 study, with pupils taking a productive and a receptive skill each half term, using an abridged format of GCSE examinations.

Homework in MFL takes into account that success in the subject is largely based on the retention of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Pupils are set vocabulary lists and are given differentiated targets for how many words to learn over a half-term. As the word lists directly relate to vocabulary covered in class, this takes the form of flip learning. Pupils are required to review their learning on a regular basis so that they complete retrieval practice based on previous modules.

Curriculum overview

In KS3 French pupils are taught to:

Grammar and vocabulary
  • identify and use tenses or other structures which convey the present, past, and future
  • use and manipulate a variety of key grammatical structures and patterns, including voices and moods, as appropriate
  • develop and use a wide-ranging and deepening vocabulary that goes beyond their immediate needs and interests, allowing them to give and justify opinions and take part in discussion about wider issues
  • use accurate grammar, spelling and punctuation
Linguistic competence
  • listen to a variety of forms of spoken language to obtain information and respond appropriately
  • transcribe words and short sentences that they hear with increasing accuracy
  • initiate and develop conversations, coping with unfamiliar language and unexpected responses, making use of important social conventions such as formal modes of address
  • express and develop ideas clearly and with increasing accuracy, both orally and in writing
  • speak coherently and confidently, with increasingly accurate pronunciation and intonation
  • read and show comprehension of original and adapted materials from a range of different sources, understanding the purpose, important ideas and details, and provide an accurate English translation of short, suitable material
  • read literary texts in the language [such as stories, songs, poems and letters] to stimulate ideas, develop creative expression and expand understanding of the language and culture
  • write prose using an increasingly wide range of grammar and vocabulary, write creatively to express their own ideas and opinions, and translate short written text accurately into French

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Autumn Term

Give opinions of school subjects

Describe your family

Say what you do with your friends

Say what makes a good friend/ideal date

Discuss healthy living (stress, sleep and relaxation)

Talk about what’s important to you in life

Say what the weather is like

Talk about your part-time job and household chores (how you usually earn money)

Talk about what you receive for Christmas

Say how you celebrate festivals

Say what you like to eat and drink

Order food in a market

Discuss healthy living

Use the phone to conduct market research

Say what you are going to do

Say what you will do

Say what breakfast you have on the trip

Compare your school timetable with the trip itinerary

Review the hotel

Talk about your trip in the past

Describe their personality

Describe how they get on with friends and family

Describe a wedding celebration

Say where they live

Say what they can do in their region

Discuss what their vice is

Describe their personality traits when it comes to work

Say what the best and worst things about their job would be

Say which sports you do

Say what you have done recently in your free-time

Say what extra-curricular activities you do

Discussing the effects of climate change

Discuss natural disasters

Say how to protect the environment

Spring Term

Describe your personality

Describe your appearance

Describe where places are in town

Say where you go in town

Say what there is in your town/region

Describe your school facilities

Say which sports you do

Ask someone if they want to go out

Describing your home

Give opinions of your holidays

Discuss school rules (uniform in French schools)

Say where you would like to work and why

Say where you normally spend your holidays

Say what you do on holiday

Say what you can do there

Say what you did on a night out/date

Describe a birthday celebration on holiday

Say what tourism jobs you would like to work as

Describe your timetable

Describe your school

Say what you read

Say what you do online

Discuss healthy living with new tech

Talk about what worries you in life and suggest possible solutions

Describe your future plans

Give opinions of your holidays

Describe your dream holiday

Book a hotel room

Describe a trip to a foreign restaurant

Say what you eat when you celebrate

What you used to do to celebrate

Say what Cinderella can / must do in her daily life

Ask questions about Cinderella’s daily life

Say what you do on holiday

Say what went wrong on a holiday

Say how the secret agent uses mobiles, tablets, MP3 players

Talk about something the agent has created online

Summer Term

Say what musical instrument you play

Give your opinion of music

Say what you do online

Say what you wear

Say what you would like to work as

Say when different festivals are

Describe a celebration

Talk about travelling to a festival

Ask for and give directions

Understanding tourist information

Talk about future holiday plans

Say what personality traits you have and whether they would suit a career in tourism

Talk about solutions to the world’s problems

Discuss natural disasters

Discussing the effects of climate change

Say what you do online to raise awareness of climate change

Say what job sectors you would be interested in and whether they are environmentally friendly

Ask people what they like to eat and drink and say whether it is environmentally friendly

Give your opinion of TV

Give your opinion of films

Say who you go on holidays with

Say how you travel

Say where you stay

Say what you would like to work as and why

Order food in a restaurant / someone’s house

Order food in a market

Say what the weather is like

Saying what you will do in certain weather

Buy clothes in a shop

Say what the best and worst things about a job in hospitality would be

Write a restaurant review

Say what qualities are important in a school friend

Say what the characters used to do when they were younger

Discuss school rules

Describing their home

Say what there is in their town/region

Discussing what to see and do in town

Describe their region

Giving advantages and disadvantages of where they live

Discussing what to see and do in town

Give your opinion of TV

Give a review of a film or TV programme you have seen

Book cinema tickets

Extra-curricular activities

We aim to convince pupils that language learning should stretch beyond the timetabled lessons. We offer the following opportunities for enrichment in languages:

  • A wide range of international trips to Europe (including Paris / Disneyland and Normandy) and beyond, with a partner school in China
  • Language taster sessions for European Day of Languages and in preparation for trips abroad
  • French café for pupils to find out about French culture and get help with homework
  • Language ambassadors who arrange fun-filled events inside and outside Murray Park, including visits to local primary schools to run taster sessions
  • Film screenings of foreign language film to complement study in lessons on cinema
  • Outside visitors, including students extolling the virtues of language study at university and living abroad

 

 

Key Stage 4:  French

Curriculum Intent

MFL teaching at Murray Park School aims to prepare pupils for the globalised world in which we live. Pupils will be given opportunities to develop their skills in understanding and responding to spoken and written texts; converse in the target language with fluency and accuracy; produce written texts designed for various purposes; use grammatical knowledge to manipulate language effectively; and increase their understanding of other cultures. It is hoped that our pupils will enter leave school with broadened horizons and opportunities that may not have been available to previous generations of their family.

In addition to these aims, which reflect the National Curriculum and GCSE exam specifications, French teachers are keen to be at the forefront of cross-curricular learning across the school, as well as in the areas of literacy, numeracy, SMSC and ICT.

The scheme of learning in MFL is planned to ensure that each module covers content from all three GCSE themes, ensuring that pupils are used to re-using vocabulary and structures in a range of contexts and become accustomed from the outset to the idea that authentic sources and conversation do not fit neatly into categories. KS3 and GCSE vocabulary and structures have been sequenced throughout the five years to ensure that pupils regularly re-use vocabulary and deepen their knowledge of each theme. For example, pupils describe their personality in year 7 modules 1 and 3, before revisiting it with more complex vocabulary in year 9 module 1 in the context of how you get on with family and friends.

Pupils are assessed throughout Key Stage 4 using assessment tasks that mirror Foundation and Higher tier GCSE papers in terms of the format of the task and the content required. In Key Stage 3, end of module assessments have been rewritten to adequately prepare pupils for Key Stage 4 study, with pupils taking a productive and a receptive skill each half term, using an abridged format of GCSE examinations.

Homework in MFL takes into account that success in the subject is largely based on the retention of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Pupils are set vocabulary lists and are given differentiated targets for how many words to learn over a half-term. As the word lists directly relate to vocabulary covered in class, this takes the form of flip learning. Pupils are required to review their learning on a regular basis so that they complete retrieval practice based on previous modules.

Curriculum overview

Following the AQA course, pupils will be prepared to write or speak in extended paragraphs, giving complex opinions, vocabulary, grammatical structures and tenses. The course is assessed in four skills with an equal weighting: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Recent changes to the GCSE have meant pupils need to understand extracts from literary texts; and be able to translate paragraphs from and into the foreign language.

Pupils are expected to write or speak about:

  • Family and relationships
  • Marriage and partnerships
  • Music
  • Cinema and TV
  • Food and eating out
  • Sport
  • Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries
  • Home, town, neighbourhood and region
  • Charity and voluntary work
  • Healthy and unhealthy living
  • The environment
  • Poverty and homelessness
  • Travel and tourism
  • Their studies
  • Life at school
  • Education post-16
  • Jobs, career choices and ambitions

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Home, town , neighbourhood and region

Travel and tourism

Relationships with family and friends

Customs and festivals

 

My studies

Life at school

Jobs, careers and ambitions

Education post-16

Spring Term

Jobs, career choices and ambitions

Technology in everyday life

Free-time activities

Social and global issues

Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries

Global and social issues

Summer Term

Me, my family and friends

Charity and voluntary work

My studies

Eating out

Revision of all 3 themes.

Extra-curricular activities

We aim to convince pupils that language learning should stretch beyond the timetabled lessons. We offer the following opportunities for enrichment in languages:

  • A wide range of international trips to Europe (including Paris / Disneyland and Normandy) and beyond, with a partner school in China
  • Language taster sessions for European Day of Languages and in preparation for trips abroad
  • French café for pupils to find out about French culture and get help with homework
  • Language ambassadors who arrange fun-filled events inside and outside Murray Park, including visits to local primary schools to run taster sessions
  • Film screenings of foreign language film to complement study in lessons on cinema
  • Outside visitors, including pupils extolling the virtues of language study at university and living abroad

Key Stage 3:  Geography

Curriculum Intent

In Geography lessons at Murray Park we aim to highlight the ‘awe and wonder’ of Geography both locally and around the world. We constantly update our curriculum to ensure our students are up-to-date with all the latest global issues. Our lessons include a range of different teaching and learning styles and we encourage our students to be independent through our project homework tasks. We look to build enquiring minds and open our students’ eyes to the world around us, making them more confident and rounded citizens.

Curriculum overview

Geography lessons at KS3 focus on three main strands as recommended the national curriculum. These include:

Locational knowledge
  • extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries, using maps of the world to focus on Africa, Russia, Asia (including China and India), and the Middle East, focusing on their environmental regions, including polar and hot deserts, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities
Human and physical geography
  • understand, through the use of detailed place-based exemplars at a variety of scales, the key processes in:
    • physical geography relating to: geological timescales and plate tectonics; rocks, weathering and soils; weather and climate, including the change in climate from the Ice Age to the present; and glaciation, hydrology and coasts
    • human geography relating to: population and urbanisation; international development; economic activity in the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary sectors; and the use of natural resources
    • understand how human and physical processes interact to influence and change landscapes, environments and the climate; and how human activity relies on the effective functioning of natural systems
    Geographical skills and fieldwork
    • build on their knowledge of globes, maps and atlases, and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom and in the field
    • interpret Ordnance Survey maps in the classroom and the field, including using grid references and scale, topographical and other thematic mapping, and aerial and satellite photographs
    • use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to view, analyse and interpret places and data
    • use fieldwork in contrasting locations to collect, analyse and draw conclusions from geographical data, using multiple sources of increasingly complex information

     

    Year 7

    Year 8

    Year 9

    Autumn Term

    Settlement – in the UK and abroad

    Plate tectonics – earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes

    Population – how do populations change

     

    `extreme environments – Deserts and ice worlds

     

     

    Spring Term

    Tropical rainforests – the lungs of the planet

     

    Tourism – How tourism has changed over time

     

     

    Tourism – Ecotourism and sustainable tourism

     

    Atmospheric hazards – tropical storms and droughts

     

     

    Climate change – Why is it such a big deal?

     

    Summer Term

    Global Development

     

    Water world – investigating rivers and coasts

     

    Challenges of the 21st Century – How is the world changing?

     

     

     

    Key Stage 4:  Geography

    Curriculum Intent

    At GCSE we aim to increase pupil confidence and allow students to express their own opinions on current world issues. We encourage pupils to develop their awareness of the world around them by discussing current issues. Our curriculum and content is constantly changing to keep our lessons relevant and reflect the real world.

    Curriculum overview

    We study AQA Geography at GCSE. Students sit three papers studying a combination of human geography, physical geography and geographical skills.

    Unit 1 (Physical)

    consists of:

    • Tectonics
    • Tropical Storms
    • Climate Change
    • Tropical Rainforests
    • Deserts
    • The Geography of the UK
    • Rivers and Coasts
    Unit 2 (Human)

    consists of:

    • Urban issues in an LIC
    • Urban issues in a HIC
    • Globalisation
    • Economic Issues in HICS and LICs
    • Global Resource Management
    • Global Food Resources
    Unit 3

    consists of:

    • School specific fieldwork questions
    • Generic fieldwork questions
    • A pre-release booklet that students respond to

     

     

    Year 10

    Year 11

    Autumn Term

    The Challenge of Natural Hazards

    Changing Economic World

    Spring Term

    Living World

    Urban Issues

     

    Physical Landscapes of the UK

    Summer Term

    Resource management

     

    Field work

    SDME and Revision

    Extra-curricular activities

    The department runs weekly commit to 6 and drop in sessions.

    Field trips will be confirmed once government guidelines have been released. Historically we have run trips to York and Italy.

Key Stage 3: German

Curriculum Intent

MFL teaching at Murray Park School aims to prepare pupils for the globalised world in which we live. Pupils will be given opportunities to develop their skills in understanding and responding to spoken and written texts; converse in the target language with fluency and accuracy; produce written texts designed for various purposes; use grammatical knowledge to manipulate language effectively; and increase their understanding of other cultures. It is hoped that our pupils will enter leave school with broadened horizons and opportunities that may not have been available to previous generations of their family.

In addition to these aims, which reflect the National Curriculum and GCSE exam specifications, German teachers are keen to be at the forefront of cross-curricular learning across the school, as well as in the areas of literacy, numeracy, SMSC and ICT.

The scheme of learning in MFL is planned to ensure that each module covers content from all three GCSE themes, ensuring that pupils are used to re-using vocabulary and structures in a range of contexts and become accustomed from the outset to the idea that authentic sources and conversation do not fit neatly into categories. Key Stage 3 (KS3) and GCSE vocabulary and structures have been sequenced throughout the five years to ensure that pupils regularly re-use vocabulary and deepen their knowledge of each theme. For example, pupils describe their personality in year 7 modules 1 and 3, before revisiting it with more complex vocabulary in year 9 module 1 in the context of how you get on with family and friends.

In KS3, end of module assessments have been rewritten to adequately prepare pupils for Key Stage 4 study, with pupils taking a productive and a receptive skill each half term, using an abridged format of GCSE examinations.

Homework in MFL takes into account that success in the subject is largely based on the retention of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Pupils are set vocabulary lists and are given differentiated targets for how many words to learn over a half-term. As the word lists directly relate to vocabulary covered in class, this takes the form of flip learning. Pupils are required to review their learning on a regular basis so that they complete retrieval practice based on previous modules.

Curriculum overview

In KS3 German pupils are taught to:

Grammar and vocabulary
  • identify and use tenses or other structures which convey the present, past, and future
  • use and manipulate a variety of key grammatical structures and patterns, including voices and moods, as appropriate
  • develop and use a wide-ranging and deepening vocabulary that goes beyond their immediate needs and interests, allowing them to give and justify opinions and take part in discussion about wider issues
  • use accurate grammar, spelling and punctuation
Linguistic competence
  • listen to a variety of forms of spoken language to obtain information and respond appropriately
  • transcribe words and short sentences that they hear with increasing accuracy
  • initiate and develop conversations, coping with unfamiliar language and unexpected responses, making use of important social conventions such as formal modes of address
  • express and develop ideas clearly and with increasing accuracy, both orally and in writing
  • speak coherently and confidently, with increasingly accurate pronunciation and intonation
  • read and show comprehension of original and adapted materials from a range of different sources, understanding the purpose, important ideas and details, and provide an accurate English translation of short, suitable material
  • read literary texts in the language [such as stories, songs, poems and letters] to stimulate ideas, develop creative expression and expand understanding of the language and culture
  • write prose using an increasingly wide range of grammar and vocabulary, write creatively to express their own ideas and opinions, and translate short written text accurately into German

 

Year 8 & 9

Autumn Term

Say what you like to eat and drink

Order food in a market

Discuss healthy living

Use the phone to conduct market research

Say what you are going to do

Say what you will do

Say what breakfast you have on the trip

Compare your school timetable with the trip itinerary

Review the hotel

Talk about your trip in the past

Spring Term

Say where you normally spend your holidays

Say what you do on holiday

Say what you can do there

Say what you did on a night out/date

Describe a birthday celebration on holiday

Say what tourism jobs you would like to work as

Describe your timetable

Describe your school

Say what you read

Say what you do online

Discuss healthy living with new tech

Talk about what worries you in life and suggest possible solutions

Summer Term

Talk about solutions to the world’s problems

Discuss natural disasters

Discussing the effects of climate change

Say what you do online to raise awareness of climate change

Say what job sectors you would be interested in and whether they are environmentally friendly

Ask people what they like to eat and drink and say whether it is environmentally friendly

Give your opinion of TV

Give your opinion of films

Say who you go on holidays with

Say how you travel

Say where you stay

Say what you would like to work as and why

Extra-curricular activities

We aim to convince pupils that language learning should stretch beyond the timetabled lessons. We offer the following opportunities for enrichment in languages:

  • A wide range of international trips to Europe (including Paris / Disneyland and Normandy) and beyond, with a partner school in China
  • Language taster sessions for European Day of Languages and in preparation for trips abroad
  • Language ambassadors who arrange fun-filled events inside and outside Murray Park, including visits to local primary schools to run taster sessions
  • Film screenings of foreign language film to complement study in lessons on cinema
  • Outside visitors, including students extolling the virtues of language study at university and living abroad

 

 

Key Stage 4:  German

Curriculum Intent

MFL teaching at Murray Park School aims to prepare pupils for the globalised world in which we live. Pupils will be given opportunities to develop their skills in understanding and responding to spoken and written texts; converse in the target language with fluency and accuracy; produce written texts designed for various purposes; use grammatical knowledge to manipulate language effectively; and increase their understanding of other cultures. It is hoped that our pupils will enter leave school with broadened horizons and opportunities that may not have been available to previous generations of their family.

In addition to these aims, which reflect the National Curriculum and GCSE exam specifications, German teachers are keen to be at the forefront of cross-curricular learning across the school, as well as in the areas of literacy, numeracy, SMSC and ICT.

The scheme of learning in MFL is planned to ensure that each module covers content from all three GCSE themes, ensuring that pupils are used to re-using vocabulary and structures in a range of contexts and become accustomed from the outset to the idea that authentic sources and conversation do not fit neatly into categories. KS3 and GCSE vocabulary and structures have been sequenced throughout the five years to ensure that pupils regularly re-use vocabulary and deepen their knowledge of each theme. For example, pupils describe their personality in year 7 modules 1 and 3, before revisiting it with more complex vocabulary in year 9 module 1 in the context of how you get on with family and friends.

Pupils are assessed throughout Key Stage 4 using assessment tasks that mirror Foundation and Higher tier GCSE papers in terms of the format of the task and the content required. In Key Stage 3, end of module assessments have been rewritten to adequately prepare pupils for Key Stage 4 study, with pupils taking a productive and a receptive skill each half term, using an abridged format of GCSE examinations.

Homework in MFL takes into account that success in the subject is largely based on the retention of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Pupils are set vocabulary lists and are given differentiated targets for how many words to learn over a half-term. As the word lists directly relate to vocabulary covered in class, this takes the form of flip learning. Pupils are required to review their learning on a regular basis so that they complete retrieval practice based on previous modules.

Curriculum overview

Following the AQA course, pupils will be prepared to write or speak in extended paragraphs, giving complex opinions, vocabulary, grammatical structures and tenses. The course is assessed in four skills with an equal weighting: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Recent changes to the GCSE have meant pupils need to understand extracts from literary texts; and be able to translate paragraphs from and into the foreign language.

Pupils are expected to write or speak about:

  • Family and relationships
  • Marriage and partnerships
  • Music
  • Cinema and TV
  • Food and eating out
  • Sport
  • Customs and festivals in German-speaking countries
  • Home, town, neighbourhood and region
  • Charity and voluntary work
  • Healthy and unhealthy living
  • The environment
  • Poverty and homelessness
  • Travel and tourism
  • Their studies
  • Life at school
  • Education post-16
  • Jobs, career choices and ambitions

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Life at school

Free time

Holidays

Jobs, career choices and ambitions

 

Spring Term

Family and relationships

My home

Food and eating out

Charity and voluntary work

The environment

Poverty and homelessness

Festivals

Summer Term

Travel and tourism

My town, neighbourhood and region

Revision of all 3 themes

Extra-curricular activities

We aim to convince pupils that language learning should stretch beyond the timetabled lessons. We offer the following opportunities for enrichment in languages:

  • A wide range of international trips to Europe (including Paris / Disneyland and Normandy) and beyond, with a partner school in China
  • Language taster sessions for European Day of Languages and in preparation for trips abroad
  • Language ambassadors who arrange fun-filled events inside and outside Murray Park, including visits to local primary schools to run taster sessions
  • Film screenings of foreign language film to complement study in lessons on cinema
  • Outside visitors, including pupils extolling the virtues of language study at university and living abroad

AS Level Government and Politics

Curriculum Intent

“Just because you do not take an interest in politics, doesn’t mean politics won’t take an interest in you." – attributed to Pericles, 5th century BC.

Politics is the study of people and power structures. It is the study of how Britain works and how the wider world can be understood through different models. To study Government and Politics is to analyse the levers of power and to understand what is required to manipulate them, to tap into the structures and ideas that shape our very waking moment whether we accept them or not. To study Government and Politics is to prepare to be the leaders and opinion-makers of tomorrow and to harness the ability to change lives and communities to your own leadership and control your destiny just a little bit more.

Curriculum Overview

Murray Park will follow the AS level Edexcel Government and Politics course comprising two components. This course is a fantastic opportunity for our students to gain a level 3 qualification and gain UCAS points.

Component 1 focuses on UK Politics and Component 2 on the UK Government. Component 1, therefore, is about the ideas and concepts, the building blocks of political life in Britain. Component 2 is about the day-to-day running of the country, the systems and structures through which power is expressed.

Students of Government and Politics must learn to understand, analyse and evaluate power and relationships in society. With these transferable skills, Government and Politics can be paired with a wide range of subjects and careers.

Year 10 Year 11
Autumn Term Democracy and participation
Elections and referendums
Parliament
The Prime Minister and Cabinet
Spring Term Political parties and pressure groups voting behaviour The Judiciary
The relationships between the branches of government.
Summer Term Role of the media
The Constitution
Revision

Extra-curricular activities

We organise day trips to support students with their studies and hope to take students on a tour of Parliament. We also have a good relationship with our local MP and have hosted a Q&A session with our MP answering questions from our students. We are hoping to run more sessions in the future.

Key Stage 4: Hair and Beauty

Staff will deliver the City and Guilds Technical award in Hair and Beauty. They will deliver three units.

UNIT 201: Exploring the world of hair and beauty

UNIT 202: The Science of Hair and Beauty

UNIT 203: Design in the hair and beauty sector

Curriculum Intent

The qualification develops the following knowledge, understanding and skills:

  • specific services carried out within the hair and beauty sectors, roles and responsibilities and typical working patterns
  • the evolution of hair and beauty from use in Ancient times to the mid-1990s
  • how technological advancements, changes to the economy and social factors have influenced the sector
  • chemistry of cosmetics and biology related to hair and beauty
  • uses of design and images for business use
  • technical hair styling, make-up and manicure skills

Curriculum Overview

Syllabus Content

UNIT 201: Learning outcome 1

Understand the key features of the Hair and Beauty sector

Topic 1.1: The industries within the sector

This is a small topic that outlines the size and scope of the Hair and Beauty industry, introducing statistics of turnover and employment within the sector. Learners will understand the hair and beauty industries and the separate businesses that operate within them.

Topic 1.2: Key features of hair and beauty careers

Learners will explore the specific services carried out by hairdressers, beauty therapists, spa therapists, media/make-up artists, cosmetic consultants, nail technicians, barbers, educators/teachers and receptionists.

Topic 1.3: Business & industry links

The pupils will learn about the roles of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, the media and leisure industries.

UNIT 201: Understand the developments of the Hair and Beauty sector.

Within this unit the pupils will study two topics:

Topic 2.1: The key features of hair and beauty in the ancient eras and the decades of the 20th century

Learners will understand how the concept of beauty has emerged over time. Pupils will also be able to demonstrate practical skills showing hair styling, make-up and nails to reflect the era.

Topic 2.2 Hair and Beauty in today’s society

UNIT 202: Understand chemistry of cosmetics and consider their uses within Hair and Beauty products.

The pupils will study the following topics:

Topic 1.1: The effects of acids and alkalis on hair and skin

Topic 1.2: The scientific principles of ingredients in hair and beauty products

Topic 1.3: Ingredients in hair and beauty products

Topic 1.4: Ethical considerations for testing cosmetics

UNIT 202: Understand biology related to the Hair and Beauty sector

Topic 2.1 Anatomy and Physiology terminology of hair, skin and nails

Topic 2.2 Hair, skin and nail conditions and how they can affect or limit treatments and services

UNIT 203: Understand the use of design in business

Learners will study the use of design in business to aid marketing, sales and the development of new products and services.

UNIT 203: Develop the technical skills required to create a hair and beauty image

Topic 2.1 Develop technical hair styling skills

During this topic, the pupils will learn how to apply products, use equipment and develop their techniques in areas, such as, blow-drying and thermal styling

Topic 2.2 Develop technical make-up skills

Topic 2.3 Develop technical manicure skills

UNIT 203: Plan, create and evaluate images for business use

Topic 3.1 Plan design images

Topic 3.2 Create design images

The pupils will learn to create images for packaging, logos, interiors, web pages and promotional materials.

Topic 3.3 Review design images

Curriculum Overview

Year 10 Year 11
Autumn Term Understand the key features and developments of the Hair and Beauty sector Understand the use of design in business and develop the technical skills required to create a Hair and Beauty image
Spring Term Understand the chemistry of cosmetics and consider their uses within Hair and Beauty products Plan, create and evaluate images for business use
Summer Term Understand biology related to the Hair and Beauty sector Plan, create and evaluate images for business use

Extra-curricular activities

The department runs a number of educational trips in order to gain insights and understanding of the hair and beauty sector; this includes an annual trip to the NEC to the National Hair and Beauty convention.

Key Stage 4: Health and Social Care

We offer Pearson’s Vocational technical award level 1/2.

Curriculum Intent

The Award gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The pupils will learn how to interpret data to assess an individual’s health and how to design a plan to improve an individual’s health and wellbeing. During the course the learners will study the care values that are vitally important in this sector and will have the opportunity to practise applying them. The students will understand human growth and development, the role of the health and social care services and the factors that affect people’s health and wellbeing.

Curriculum Overview

Learners are required to complete and achieve all three components in the qualification.

  • Human Lifespan Development
  • Health and Social Care Services and Values
  • Health and Wellbeing

The three components focus on the assessment of knowledge, skills and practices. These are all essential to developing a basis for progression and, therefore, learners need to achieve all components in order to achieve the qualification. The components are interrelated. Learners will be given the opportunity to build their confidence in understanding the sector, vocational contexts and vocational attributes before they are assessed.

Assessment

Components 1 and 2 are assessed through internal assessment. This style of assessment promotes deep learning through ensuring the connection between knowledge and practice.

There is one external assessment which is Component 3. Component 3 builds directly on Components 1 and 2 and enables learning to be brought together and related to a real-life situation.

Year 10 Year 11
Autumn Term Human Lifespan Health and Wellbeing
Spring Term Human Lifespan Health and Social Care Services and Values
Summer Term Human Lifespan and Health and Wellbeing Health and Social Care Services and Values

Extra-curricular activities

The department runs a number of educational trips that allow students to experience real life situations in care homes.

Key Stage 3: History

Curriculum Intent

History at Murray Park School will grow a generation of young people who are passionate, curious and active citizens in Derby. Our History curriculum will help students to make sense of the world they live in, and will help them to cement their place within their city. We aim to equip students by developing their knowledge and understanding of the past and helping them understand how and why things have changed.

We want students to develop a love of learning as well as build their enquiry skills, learn to evaluate evidence so they can reach their own judgments and opinions about key historical events. Our curriculum will be enquiry-led, enabling students to experience what it is like to be an historian, trying to answer questions about the past. Our approach to teaching History is based on current thinking and pedagogy. Our curriculum evolves to incorporate new scholarship and our lessons allow students to experience real History.

A key aim of the Murray Park History curriculum is to challenge and re-examine traditional narratives, and give students the opportunity to learn about histories other than the traditional canon of British historical education. The curriculum is therefore a vehicle to promote social justice and the common values of diversity, tolerance, equality and democracy.

The curriculum will be challenging, History is hard! We don’t always have the answers to the questions we are asking and we want our young historians to be able to grapple with these frustrations.

Aims:

The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all students:

  • Know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • Know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • Gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales

Curriculum Overview

Course outline and structure

Each Year group covers a new unit of work each half term and students’ learning is regularly assessed.

Year 7 start with an Introduction to History and a study into early Medieval England. We then study the Norman Conquest and its immediate and long term consequences on the UK.  Term 2 sees Year 7 studying Medieval Life 1066 – 1509 and Term 3 is a study of the medieval world. This enables students to compare medieval England to societies throughout the world and also ensures they develop an understanding of world history. Students learn about how society was run during both periods and what it was like to be alive at these times. Students study the following topics – how society was run and organized, the importance of religion, crime and punishment plus many others.  Students also explore a pre-1066 topic in the summer term. Students look at British immigration over time and explore the impact and significance of these different groups. This develops their understanding of thematic studies to complement their understanding of chronology.

Year 8 build on their learning from the previous year by looking at England during the 16th century, in particular the English reformation, where they evaluate its religious, political and social impact. This is a crucial study for understanding diversity and social change to underpin their knowledge gained in year 7. Students undertake a study of Black Tudors by Miranda Kaufmann which increases their understanding of historical interpretations and how history is forever changing and developing. Term 2 in dominated by a study of World History centred on the British Empire and leading into a study of the big social changes of the 18th and 19th centuries - primarily the Industrial Revolution. Students have the opportunity to study different colonial countries and make their own judgements about the impact of the empire. Students focus on the case study of India. In Term 3, students study the Slave Trade and the Civil Rights Movement in the USA and are then able to make comparisons with the struggles for Women’s Rights in the UK. The People and Protest unit also enable students to compare various protest movements throughout world history and ensure they make comparisons to modern day movements such as BLM and Extinction Rebellion.

Year 9 History at Murray Park is focused on the 20th century.  The year runs chronologically starting with the world at the beginning of the 20th century. We then study the origins of World War One and looking in depth at the conflict in the early 20th century. Students explore the Russian revolution and consider the impact on World War one but also the world balance of power. This enables students to grapple with challenging philosophical concepts and knowledge that underpins knowledge gained in other subject areas. We then study the rise of extremism in the 1930s and the steps to WW2. Students look in some depth at the turning points of World War Two and the impact this had on Europe and the rest of the world.  This leads into the final scheme of learning at KS3 which concentrates on the Holocaust and the post war world. Our lessons are designed by the Holocaust Educational Trust and we work closely with the trust to ensure our students receive the best possible Holocaust education. We also have been able to organise a visit with the trust.

An outline of what students will study during their time at Murray Park throughout Key Stage 3 is set out in the table below:

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Autumn Term

Why was England in turmoil?

How did William keep control of England?

 

 

How far did life change in Tudor England?

Were the 1600s really a world turned upside down?

 

The causes of World War One

 

Did everyone feel the effects of the Great War?

 

 

Spring Term

Are Horrible Histories correct? Was it really the measly Middle Ages?

 

Why was Jerusalem worth dying for?

What was the legacy of the slave trade?

 

Who benefited from the British Empire?

 

 

 

Why were the Russians revolting?

Why was there another war?

 

 

Summer Term

How did the rest of the world develop in the Middle ages?

 

Is Britain a nation of migrants?

 

 

Would you have survived the Industrial Revolution?

 

People and Protest-From suffragettes to Civil Rights

 

World War Two and the Holocaust

 

What was it like to live in the post war world?

 

Extra-curricular activities

The department offers a number of curriculum-related trips Students have the opportunity to visit Warwick Castle. We are also organising a trip to the First World War battlefields of Belgium and Northern France.

Students get the chance to attend the trip to Berlin or the trip to Krakow that run on alternate years. This year we are taking pupils to Auschwitz in Poland to meet a Holocaust survivor. We also have a Holocaust survivor visiting our school to meet with students in year 9. This ensures our students not only learn about history in the classroom but are able to experience real history.

There is also a KS3 History Club who meet one lunchtime a week. Here students have the opportunity to explore additional topics from outside of our curriculum, and to enrich their understanding of those they have studied. We have helped organise the remembrance week in school and are working towards making a remembrance memorial for the new garden. 

There is also a KS3/KS4 Debate and Politics club. We meet weekly and run mock debates and trials throughout the year. We take part in the Derby city debate competition with the University of Derby. Students have the opportunity to work with trainee law students and current solicitors to improve their debating skills. 

 

 

KS4 History

Curriculum Intent

History at Murray Park School will grow a generation of young people who are passionate, curious and active citizens in Derby. Our History curriculum will help students to make sense of the world they live in, and will help them to cement their place within their city. We aim to equip students by developing their knowledge and understanding of the past and helping them understand how and why things have changed.

A key aim of the Murray Park History curriculum is to challenge and re-examine traditional narratives, and give students the opportunity to learn about histories other than the traditional canon of British historical education. The curriculum is therefore a vehicle to promote social justice and the common values of diversity, tolerance, equality and democracy.

Curriculum Overview

Course outline and structure-GCSE History

Exam Board: Edexcel

The Pearson Edexcel GCSE (9–1) in History consists of three externally examined papers that students will sit in the summer of Year 11. This course offers a diverse and comprehensive coverage of aspects of human History that are both pertinent to understanding our world today, with all of its challenges; and the study of the past. The course covers a swathe of British History through the lens of Crime and Punishment from the Middle Ages to the present day as well as tackling questions of power, privilege and society in Elizabethan England.

We hope that we provide a relevant, modern, curriculum to prepare students for life in the 21st Century, allowing them to use what they know to judge the future by the past and to engage in making their own history in a conscious manner.

 

Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment. Written examination: 1 hour and 15 minutes 30%* of the qualification. 52 marks (16 for the historic environment, 36 for the thematic study.) In Year 10 students study Crime and punishment in Britain, c1000–present. Students also have an environment study on Whitechapel, c1870–c1900: crime, policing and the inner city.

Paper 2: Period study and British depth study. Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes 40%* of the qualification 64 marks (32 for the period study and 32 for the British depth study.) In year 11 students complete the depth study and start the third unit. The third unit, and first topic of Paper 2, is Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941–91. Students explore the origins of the Cold War, the key events and then the ending of the Cold War. The final unit of the GCSE course is the second topic of paper 2, Early Elizabethan England, 1558–88. Students investigate Elizabeth’s court, her domestic and international problems including whether this really was a ‘Golden Age’.

Paper 3: Modern depth study. Written examination: 1 hour and 20 minutes 30%* of the qualification 52 marks. Students also study the depth study in year 10, Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918–This includes the creation of the Weimar Republic, The Rise of Nazi Party and the Nazi Dictatorship.

 

The total qualification mark is 168, of which 8 marks are for spelling, punctuation, grammar and use of specialist terminology (SPaG).

 

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Introduction to Crime and Punishment

 

Medieval C&P

Early Modern C&P

Crime and Punishment in the Industrial era

Changing definitions of C&P in the present day

Introduction to the Cold War

The Origins of the Cold War

Key events of the Cold War

 

How did the Cold War end?

 

Mock exams

Spring Term

Environment study- Whitechapel

Introduction to Weimar Germany

 

Introduction to Elizabethan England

Religion and the Elizabethan court

Mock exams

Domestic and international problems

Leisure in Elizabethan England

 

 

 

Summer Term

Mock exams

The rise of Hitler and the Nazis

 

Nazi control and life in Nazi Germany

Revision and final exams

Extra-curricular activities

The department offers a number of curriculum-related trips, such as, a trip to Whitechapel in London.

KS4 students get the chance to attend the trip to Berlin or the trip to Krakow that run on alternate years. This year we are taking pupils to Auschwitz in Poland to meet a Holocaust survivor. We also have a Holocaust survivor visiting our school to meet with year 9.

There is also a KS4 Debate and Politics club. We meet weekly and run mock debates and trials throughout the year. We take part in the Derby city debate competition with the University of Derby. Students have the opportunity to work with trainee law students and current solicitors to improve their debating skills.  

 

 

Key Stage 4: Ancient History

Curriculum Intent

Ancient History differs from a GCSE in History due to the nature of the sources you will use. While archaeological and other evidence is considered, much of our knowledge of comes from ‘historians’ of the time who actually saw themselves as writers of literature or moral philosophy. Through these sources, you will learn about and judge the actions of Alexander of Macedon, who expanded the Greek-speaking world over much of Asia; you will see how Cyrus the Great established a Persian Empire and how a female ruler and how the Roman invasion of Britain unfolded. This course consequently offers a wide range of reading and invites the student to apply both their knowledge and interpretation of this work in the exams.

Curriculum Overview

Greece and Persia

The compulsory period study focuses on the Persian Empire under Cyrus the Great, Cambyses II, Darius I and Xerxes I. Students develop their understanding of the unfolding narrative of substantial developments and issues associated with this period.

Students study one depth study:

Alexander the Great, 356—323 BC.

Paper details: The paper is 1 hour 45 minutes long and is worth 50%.

Rome and its neighbours

The compulsory longer period study focuses on the kings of Rome and the early Roman Republic, with an emphasis on the most interesting events and characters.

Students study one depth study:

Britannia: from conquest to province, AD 43 — c. 84.

Paper details: The paper is 1 hour 45 minutes long and is worth 50%.

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Persian Kings

Roman Period study

Spring Term

Persian Kings and Alexander the Great

Roman Depth study

Summer Term

Alexander the Great and Roman Period Study

Roman Depth and Revision

Useful websites

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/

https://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history

https://www.britishmuseum.org/

Extra-curricular activities

Pupils will have the opportunity to take part in day trips linked to the study of our course. We are planning a day trip to the British museum to explore Ancient sources and monuments.

Key Stage 3: Mathematics

Curriculum Intent:

The mathematics teaching at Murray Park is geared towards enabling each pupil to develop within their capabilities; not only the mathematics skills and understanding required for later life, but also an enthusiasm and fascination about maths itself.

We aim to:

  • Increase pupil confidence in maths so they are able to express themselves and their ideas using the language of maths with assurance.
  • Stimulate pupils' interest in mathematics
  • Encourage pupils to think logically, and to solve mathematical problems both within mathematics lessons, and in other curriculum areas.

We are continually raising the standards of achievement of the pupils at Murray Park, ensuring all students are challenged to meet their full potential.

Curriculum Overview:

All pupils in KS3 follow the National Curriculum.  The yearly teaching programmes for Years 7 to 9 are set out by the National framework and are organised in five main strands, linked to the National Curriculum. The areas covered are:

Number

Ratio and Proportion

Algebra

Geometry and Measures

Probability and Statistics

Alongside the teaching in the classroom students will be directed to use the following websites for homework purposes or for revision materials:

Hegarty Maths – www.hegartymaths.co.uk

TTRockstars – www.ttrockstars.com

National Oak Academy - https://classroom.thenational.academy/subjects-by-key-stage/key-stage-3/subjects/maths

An outline of what students will study during their time at Murray Park School throughout Key Stage 3 is set out in the table below:

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Autumn Term

Working with Number and the Number System and other applications of the four operations. ( +, - , x , ÷ )

Types of number and the properties of number and its application.

Working with Algebraic Expressions.

Graphs and proportion and being able to draw these.

Working with Sequences and finding algebraic links.

Spring Term

Introducing Geometry, working with shapes their properties and angles.

Introducing fractions and their properties and application of use.

Working with 2D Geometry – Angles, Areas, Perimeters and properties.

Proportional Reasoning- Working with Ratio and Percentages.

Working with Equations and inequalities.

Application of shape and angles.

Summer Term

Applications of Algebra and Working with Statistics and Percentages.

3D Geometry – Working with Volume and measures.

Statistics- working with averages and comparing data sets.

Working with Right angled triangles.

Calculating Probability and its application.

 

 

Key Stage 4:  Mathematics

Curriculum Intent:

The mathematics teaching at Murray Park is geared towards enabling each pupil to develop within their capabilities; not only the mathematics skills and understanding required for later life, but also an enthusiasm and fascination about maths itself.

We aim to:

  • Increase pupil confidence in maths so they are able to express themselves and their ideas using the language of maths with assurance.
  • Stimulate pupils' interest in mathematics
  • Encourage pupils to think logically, and to solve mathematical problems both within mathematics lessons, and in other curriculum areas.

We are continually raising the standards of achievement of the pupils at Murray Park, ensuring all students are challenged to meet their full potential.

Curriculum Overview:

Pupils will be required to demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and skills in the following areas:

Number

Ratio and Proportion

Algebra

Geometry and Measures

Probability and Statistics

Alongside the teaching in the classroom students will be directed to use the following websites for homework purposes or for revision materials:

Hegarty Maths – www.hegartymaths.co.uk

National Oak Academy - https://classroom.thenational.academy/subjects-by-key-stage/key-stage-4/subjects/maths

OnMaths - https://www.onmaths.com/

Corbett Maths - https://corbettmaths.com/contents/

Assessment for all groups in both Year 10 and Year 11 is via the Linear GCSE examination. This consists of three written papers; two calculator and a non-calculator which will be sat in the summer term of Year 11 at the end of the course.

Students in Year 10 will continue to follow the scheme of work helping their skills to progress further in line the National Curriculum to support the GCSE examinations, please see a guideline below. Whereas, Year 11 follow a tailored scheme of work from their mock exams highlighting specific areas of need to be intervened in lessons to support students working on their areas of weaknesses.

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Working with Fractions and Standard Form.

Trigonometry, Pythagoras’ Theorem and transformations.

Working with Number and its applications.

Transformations, area, volume and properties and application of geometry.

Spring Term

Reasoning using algebra and the applications linking to other areas of Maths.

Properties and application of 3D shapes.

Working through probability and statistics and the application of these and Algebraic methods and reasoning.

Summer Term

Sampling and Probability.

Application of algebra into further solving equations.

Revision and preparation for the summer exams.

Key Stage 3: Physical Education

The Physical Education Team at Murray Park are committed and enthused experts in their respective fields, bringing a wealth of knowledge and experience into to the classroom. We strive to equip pupils with the skills and qualifications to go on and become the next generation of creative and skilled practitioners in their chosen field. Our mission is to build confidence and encourage pupils to become independent and resilient learners.

Our curriculum is designed to install a love of learning, making links to industry of physical education. The department is developing major cross-curricular skills which are important in other subject areas beyond our own. Learning is well balanced between practical and academic skills providing a rich and informative mix of engaging and purposeful lessons.

Curriculum Intent

The Physical Education department at Murray Park are committed and enthused experts in their respective fields, bringing a wealth of knowledge and experience into to the classroom. We strive to equip pupils with the skills and qualifications to go on and become the next generation of creative and skilled practitioners in their chosen field. Our mission is to build confidence and encourage pupils to become independent and resilient learners.

Our curriculum is designed to install a love of learning, making links to industry of physical education. The department is developing major cross-curricular skills which are important in other subject areas beyond our own. Learning is well balanced between practical and academic skills providing a rich and informative mix of engaging and purposeful lessons.  The aim is to develop competence for students to excel in a broad range of physical activities, students to be physically active for sustained periods of time and engage in competitive sports and activities to
lead healthy, active lives.

Curriculum overview

During key stage three, leaners will experience a range of circumstances that will learners to work in a competitive situation use a range of tactics and strategies to overcome opponents in direct competition through team and individual games. They will develop their technique and improve their performance through competitive sports, analyse their performances compared to previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best, perform dances using advanced dance techniques in a range of dance styles and forms and take part in competitive sports and activities inside and outside school through community links or sports clubs.

KS3 Curriculum in Physical Education – Due to facilities activities merge across the terms.

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Y7

Gymnastics, Football, Rugby, HRE,

Basketball, Dance, Table Tennis, Badminton

Rounders, Baseball, Cricket, Tennis Athletics

Y8

Gymnastics, Table Tennis, HRE, Badminton, Rugby

Dance, Handball, Basketball, Football

Rounders, Baseball, Cricket, Athletics, Tennis

Y9

Gymnastics, Table Tennis, HRE, Badminton, Rugby

Dance, Handball, Basketball, Football, Trampolining, Dodgeball

Rounders, Baseball, Cricket, Athletics, Tennis

Extra-curricular activities

We aim to supplement our broad curriculum with a range of extra-curricular activities to enrich pupils experience and enjoyment of learning.

The following extra-curricular clubs are run throughout the year. The School competes at City and County level competitions.

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Badminton, Table Tennis, Football, Rugby, Self-Defence, Gymnastics and Netball.

Badminton, Table Tennis, Football, Netball, Trampolining and Basketball.

Rounders, Baseball, Cricket, Tennis and Athletics

The department run a number of educational trips that allow students to experience live professional sport. The department also run a biannual ski trip to Europe.

 

 

Key Stage 4:  Physical Education Examination subjects

In Physical education we offer learners two different examination courses.

Edexcel 1-9 GCSE PE

Edexcel BTEC Sport Level 1/2

Curriculum Intent – GCSE PE

  • develop theoretical knowledge and understanding of the factors that underpin physical activity and sport and use this knowledge and understanding to improve performance
  • understand how the physiological and psychological state affects performance in physical activity and sport
  • perform effectively in different physical activities by developing skills and techniques and selecting and using tactics, strategies and/or compositional ideas
  • develop their ability to analyse and evaluate to improve performance in physical activity and sport
  • understand the contribution that physical activity and sport make to health, fitness and well-being
  • understand the key socio-cultural influences that can affect people’s involvement in physical activity and sport.

Theory

Components assesses students’ knowledge and understanding of the factors underpinning physical activity and sport performance. Students will develop their theoretical knowledge and understanding of applied anatomy and physiology, movement analysis and physical training so that they can use this knowledge to analyse and evaluate performance and devise informed strategies for improving/optimising their own practical performance.

Practical:  Individual and team activities

Students will be required to perform in three different physical activities in the role of player/performer. For each physical activity, students will be required to demonstrate their skills in isolation/unopposed situations and demonstrate their skills in a competitive/formal (e.g. full-sided game where appropriate) situation while under pressure. Students should be taught to make relevant and appropriate links between their learning in Components 1 and 2 and use this to benefit their performances in the physical activities. Students should develop their ability and aptitude in physical activities, demonstrating the skills and techniques learnt.

Curriculum overview

Component 1: Fitness and Body Systems (*Component code: 1PE0/01) 

Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes 36% of the qualification 90 marks

Content overview

  • Topic 1: Applied anatomy and physiology
  • Topic 2: Movement analysis
  • Topic 3: Physical training
  • Topic 4: Use of data

Assessment overview

The assessment consists of multiple-choice, short-answer, and extended writing questions. Students must answer all questions.  Calculators can be used in the examination

Component 2: Health and Performance  

Written examination: 1 hour and 15 minutes: 24% of the qualification

Content overview

  • Topic 1: Health, fitness and well-being
  • Topic 2: Sport psychology
  • Topic 3: Socio-cultural influences
  • Topic 4: Use of data: Assessment overview

The assessment consists of multiple-choice, short-answer, and extended writing questions. Students must answer all questions.  Calculators can be used in the examination.

Component 3: Practical Performance

Non-examined assessment: internally marked and externally moderated: 30% of the qualification (35 marks per activity)

Content overview

  • Skills during individual and team activities
  • General performance skills

Assessment overview

The assessment consists of students completing three physical activities from a set list. One must be a team activity and one must be an individual activity. The final activity can be a free choice. Students must participate in three separate activities.  Each activity can last up to 12 hours. These will be assessed by the teacher and moderated by the examination board.

Component 4: Personal Exercise Programme (PEP)

Non-examined assessment: internally marked and externally moderated

10% of the qualification: 20 marks

Content overview

  • Aim and planning analysis
  • Carrying out and monitoring the Personal Exercise Programme (PEP)
  • Evaluation of the PEP Assessment

Overview

The assessment consists of students producing a Personal Exercise Programme (PEP) and will require students to analyse and evaluate their performance. These will be assessed by the teacher and moderated by the examination board - Pearson.

 

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Anatomy and Physiology:

The structure and functions of the musculo-skeletal system.

The structure and functions of the cardio-vascular system.

The structure and function of the respiratory system

Aerobic and anaerobic exercise

Short-term effects of Exercise

Health, Fitness and Well-being:

Physical, emotional and social health, fitness and well-being

The consequences of a sedentary lifestyle

Energy use, diet, nutrition and hydration

Spring Term

Movement Analysis

First, second and third class levers and their use in physical activity.

Mechanical advantage and disadvantage of the body’s lever systems.

Planes and axes of movement applied to sporting actions.

Sport Psychology:

The classifications of skills

Practice Structures

Using goal setting and smart targets to improve performance

Providing guidance and feedback on performance

Mentally preparing for performance

Summer Term

Physical Training:

The relationship between health and fitness, and the role that exercise plays in both.

The components of fitness, their benefits for sport, and how fitness is measured and improved.

The principles of training and their application to personal exercise/training programmes.

The long-term effects of exercise.

How to optimise training and prevent injury.

Effective use of warm up and cool down.

Socio-cultural Influences:

Engagement patterns of different social groups in physical activity

Commercialisation of physical activity and sport

Ethical and socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport.

Curriculum Intent – BTEC Sport

To give learners opportunities to link education and the world of work in engaging, relevant and practical ways

  • enable learners to enhance their English and mathematical competence in relevant, applied scenarios
  • support learners’ development of transferable interpersonal skills, including working with others, problem solving, independent study and personal, learning and thinking skills
  • give learners a route through education that has clear progression pathways to further study or an Apprenticeship.

This qualification has a core of underpinning knowledge, skills and understanding, and a range of options to reflect the breadth of pathways in a sector. This gives learners the opportunity to:

  • gain a broad understanding and knowledge of a vocational sector
  • investigate areas of specific interest
  • develop essential skills and attributes prized by employers, further education colleges and higher education institutions.

This qualification provides opportunities for learners to progress to either academic or more specialised vocational pathways.

Curriculum Overview

Students will study three mandatory units, covering the underpinning knowledge and skills required for the sports sector:

  • fitness for sport and exercise
  • practical performance in sport
  • applying the principles of personal training.

They will build on the knowledge gained in the mandatory units by completing the leading sports activities unit.

Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Sport – Units to be covered

1 Fitness for Sport and Exercise

2 Practical Performance in Sport

3 Applying the Principles of Personal Training

4 Leading Sports Activities

Assessment

Students will carry out tasks/assignments throughout the course. These will be marked and students will receive feedback as to how they are getting on. For the assessment for Unit 3 Applying the Principles of Personal Training, students will be able to draw on the knowledge, skills and understanding they have developed in the qualification as a whole. Unit 3 is an internally marked task set by the examination board. The assessment criteria require learners to demonstrate that they can identify and use effectively an appropriate selection of skills, techniques, concepts, theories and knowledge from across the units.

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Fitness for Sport / Practical Performance in Sport

Applying the principles of personnel training

Spring Term

Fitness for Sport / Practical Performance in Sport

Leading Sports Activities

Summer Term

Applying the principles of personnel training / Practical Performance in Sport

Leading Sports Activities

Extra-curricular activities

The department also run a number of educational trips that allow students to experience live professional sport. The department also run a biannual ski trip to Europe.

 

 

Key Stage 4:  Physical Education Core PE

Curriculum Intent: Core PE

The Physical Education department at Murray Park are committed and enthused experts in their respective fields, bringing a wealth of knowledge and experience into to the classroom. We strive to equip pupils with the skills and qualifications to go on and become the next generation of creative and skilled practitioners in their chosen field. Our mission is to build confidence and encourage pupils to become independent and resilient learners.
Our curriculum is designed to install a love of learning, making links to industry of physical education. The department is developing major cross-curricular skills which are important in other subject areas beyond our own. Learning is well balanced between practical and academic skills providing a rich and informative mix of engaging and purposeful lessons.  The aim is to develop competence for students to excel in a broad range of physical activities, students to be physically active for sustained periods of time and engage in competitive sports and activities to lead healthy, active lives.

Curriculum overview

Through the Key stage 4 programme, learners have the opportunity to experience, use and develop a variety of tactics and strategies to overcome opponents in team and individual games, develop their technique and improve their performance in other competitive sports. They will also evaluate their performances compared to previous ones and demonstrate improvement across a range of physical activities to achieve their personal best. Throughout the lessons, the pupils are encouraged to work in teams, developing skills to solve problems in different roles and develop an understanding of the body and how it works during exercise and recovery.

Y10

Students follow an options system that gives them a chance to specialise in particular games and individual activities. These cover most of the major team games, striking and fielding activities, net wall, gymnastics and health related fitness.

Y11

Students follow an options system that gives them a chance to specialise in particular games and individual activities. These cover most of the major teams games, striking and fielding activities, net wall, gymnastics and health related fitness

Extra-curricular activities

We aim to supplement our broad curriculum with a range of extra-curricular activities to enrich the pupils’ experience and enjoyment of learning.

The following extra-curricular clubs are run throughout the year. The School competes at City and County level competitions.

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Badminton, Table Tennis, Football, Rugby, Self-Defence, Gymnastics and Netball.

Badminton, Table Tennis, Football, Netball, Trampolining and Basketball.

Rounders, Baseball, Cricket, Tennis and Athletics

The department runs a number of educational trips that allow students to experience live professional sport. The department also runs a biannual ski trip to Europe.

Key Stage 3:  PSHE

Curriculum Intent

The PSHE curriculum provides pupils with the knowledge, understanding, attitudes, values and skills they need in order to reach their potential as individuals and within the community. Pupils learn to understand and respect our common humanity, diversity and differences so that they can go on to form the effective, fulfilling relationships that are an essential part of life and learning. For all students to develop an understanding of the ever changing world in which we live, develop the skills necessary to take an active role in their community and manage their life effectively.

The PSHE programme will support the development of the skills, attitudes, values and patterns of behaviour, which enable our pupils to:

  • Have a sense of purpose
  • Value self and others
  • Form relationships
  • Make and act on informed decisions
  • Communicate effectively
  • Work with others
  • Respond to challenge
  • Be an active partner in their own learning
  • Be active citizens within the local community
  • Explore issues related to living in a democratic society
  • Become healthy and fulfilled individual

Curriculum Overview

As a department, we recognise that PSHE has a significant part to play in preparing children and young people to deal effectively with the pressures and challenges that growing up in the 21st century presents in our own community and in the UK. Pupils are encouraged to take part in a wide range of activities and experiences across and beyond the curriculum, contributing fully to the life of the school and community. In doing so, pupils learn to recognise their own worth, work well with others and become increasingly responsible for their own learning. They reflect on their experiences and understand how they are developing personally and socially, tackling many of the spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues that are part of growing up. Pupils study relationships and sex education as part of their PSHE course.

The pupils study a range of topics including:

 

Topics

Year 7

  • Wellbeing-  my life
  • Lifestyle
  • Making choices
  • Healthy habits
  • Responsibility
  • Personal growth
  • Challenge and opportunities
  • Hobbies and achievements

Year 8

  • Wellbeing - my mind
  • Healthy body, healthy mind
  • Mind training
  • Mental toughness
  • Resilience
  • Determination

Year 9

  • Illegal and legal drugs
  • Risk and effects
  • Knife crime

 

Extra-curricular activities

Drop down days and external visitors are used to support delivery of this subject.

 

Finance Education

Curriculum Overview

 

Topics

Year 7

  • Accounts savings and loans
  • How to avoid debt
  • Personal budgeting
  • Saving loans and interest rates
  • Pensions

 

Year 8

  • Income and expenditure
  • Using financial products
  • The importance of budgeting
  • Credit and debit

 

Year 9

  • Needs and wants
  • Money laundering
  • Income and expenditure
  • Public taxes
  • Successful money management

 

 

 

Key Stage 4:  Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE)

Curriculum Intent

The aim of PSHE is to provide pupils with the knowledge, understanding, attitudes, values and skills they need in order to reach their potential as individuals and within the community. Pupils learn to understand and respect our common humanity, diversity and differences so that they can go on to form the effective, fulfilling relationships that are an essential part of life and learning. For all students to develop an understanding of the ever changing world in which we live, develop the skills necessary to take an active role in their community and manage their life effectively.

The PSHE programme will support the development of the skills, attitudes, values and patterns of behaviour, which enable our pupils to:

  • Have a sense of purpose
  • Value self and others
  • Form relationships
  • Make and act on informed decisions
  • Communicate effectively
  • Work with others
  • Respond to challenge
  • Be an active partner in their own learning
  • Be active citizens within the local community
  • Explore issues related to living in a democratic society
  • Become healthy and fulfilled individual

Curriculum Overview

As a department, we recognise that PSHE has a significant part to play in preparing children and young people to deal effectively with the pressures and challenges that growing up in the 21st century presents in our own community and in the UK. Pupils are encouraged to take part in a wide range of activities and experiences across and beyond the curriculum, contributing fully to the life of the school and community. In doing so, pupils learn to recognise their own worth, work well with others and become increasingly responsible for their own learning. They reflect on their experiences and understand how they are developing personally and socially, tackling many of the spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues that are part of growing up. Pupils study relationships and sex education as part of their PSHE course.

The pupils study a range of topics including:

 

Topics

Year 10

  • Smoking
  • Alcohol
  • Capital punishment
  • Genetic engineering
  • Discrimination
  • Gambling and gaming
  • Grooming and sexual exploitation
  • Money management
  • Money laundering
  • Income and expenditure

Year 11

  • Knife crime
  • Body image
  • Sex and relationships
  • Consent
  • STIs
  • Sexting

Extra-curricular activities

Drop down days and external visitors are used to support the delivery of this subject.

Key Stage 3:  Religious Studies

Curriculum Intent

In Religious Studies lesson we enable students to engage with and explore religion, including the 6 main world religions and humanism, so that they may develop and deepen their own sense of spirituality, appreciate and understand other beliefs and viewpoints and work towards academic excellence at Key Stage 3.

Our aims are:

  • To help students appreciate and understand other people’s beliefs and viewpoints
  • To help students understand that the world is full of people whose views may differ greatly from their own
  • To enable students to respect someone else’s viewpoint, even though it may differ greatly from their own
  • To equip students with the skills needed for dealing with situations where they encounter differing viewpoints and challenges to their own thinking
  • To help students understand that everyone’s opinion matters, regardless of race, colour, religion, gender, age or sexual orientation.

Curriculum Overview

As a department, we recognise that RS has a significant part to play in preparing children and young people to deal effectively with the pressures and challenges that growing up in the 21st century presents in our own community and in the UK. Pupils are encouraged to take part in a wide range of activities and experiences across and beyond the curriculum, contributing fully to the life of the school and community. In doing so, pupils learn to recognise their own worth, work well with others and become increasingly responsible for their own learning. They reflect on their experiences and understand how they are developing personally and socially, tackling many of the spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues that are part of growing up. 

The pupils study a range of topics including:

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Autumn Term

Beliefs

Islam

Christianity Rites of Passage

Judaism

Good and Evil

Religion and medical Ethics

Spring Term

Hinduism

Sikhism

Easter

Religion, Peace and Justice

Religion and Science

Summer Term

Buddhism

Humanism

Alternative belief systems

Religion and Human Relationships

End of Life

Extra-curricular activities

Drop down days and outside speakers are used to support the delivery of this subject.

 

 

Key Stage 4: Core Religious Studies

Curriculum Intent

Students will be challenged with questions about belief, values, meaning, purpose and truth, enabling them to develop their own attitudes towards religious issues.

Students will also gain an appreciation of how religion, philosophy and ethics form the basis of our culture. They will develop analytical and critical thinking skills, the ability to work with abstract ideas, leadership and research skills.

Students will consider different beliefs and attitudes to religious and non-religious issues in contemporary British society.

Curriculum Overview

  • To help students appreciate and understand other people’s beliefs and viewpoints
  • To help students understand that the world is full of people whose views may differ greatly from their own
  • To enable students to respect someone else’s viewpoint, even though it may differ from their own
  • To equip students with the skills needed for dealing with situations where they encounter differing viewpoints and challenges to their own thinking
  • To help students understand that everyone’s opinion matters, regardless of race, colour, religion, gender, age or sexual orientation.

Pupils study a range of topics including:

 

Topics

Year 10

Religion and human relationships

 

Year 11

Religion and the media

 

 

Key Stage 4:  GCSE Religious Studies

Curriculum Intent

Students will study the beliefs, teachings and practices of Christianity and their basis in Christian sources of wisdom and authority. They should be able to refer to scripture and/or sacred texts where appropriate. Students will study the influence of the beliefs, teachings and practices studied on individuals, communities and societies. Common and divergent views within Christianity in the way beliefs and teachings are understood and expressed will be included throughout.

Students will study the beliefs, teachings and practices of Islam. They will be able to refer to scripture and other writings where appropriate. Students will study the influence of the beliefs, teachings and practices studied on individuals, communities and societies. Common and divergent views within Islam in the way beliefs and teachings are understood and expressed will be included throughout. Students will study a range of different Muslim perspectives in their answers, including those from Sunni and Shi’a Islam.

Curriculum Overview

The students will study the AQA Religious Studies A Course.

Paper 1

Christianity 

  • Key beliefs and teachings
  • Religious Practices
  • Jesus Christ and salvation
  • Worship and festivals
  • The role of the church in the local and worldwide community

Islam

  • Key beliefs and teachings
  • Religious practices
  • Authority
  • Worship
  • Duties and festivals

 

Paper 2:

Students will study religious teachings, and religious, philosophical and ethical arguments, and their impact and influence in the modern world.

They will study four themes:

Theme A: Relationships and families

Theme B: Religion and life

Theme E: Religion, crime and punishment

Theme F: Religion, human rights and social justice

 

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

·         Christianity paper 1

·         Paper 2 Theme E

Spring Term

·         Islam paper 1

·         Paper 2 Theme A

·         Paper 2 Theme F

·         Revision

Summer Term

·         Paper 2 Theme B

 

Extra-curricular activities

Drop down days and external speakers are used to support the units.

Key Stage 3: Science

Curriculum Intent

The Science Department at Murray Park School aims to ensure that every student is able to understand and critically evaluate any scientific problem they may be faced with in an ever-changing, modern world. Through the courses that we offer, we seek to provide an inspiring range of experiences both in and outside the classroom.

The Murray Park Science Department is committed to ensuring that all pupils make greater than expected progress across all key stages in this exciting subject. We uphold and display the values of the school and encourage the students to also be bold at every possible opportunity within our subject area.

Curriculum Overview

During Key Stage 3 the students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts, terms, and issues. This will be achieved through the development of experimental skills and embedding knowledge that can be described and explained using key words and concepts.

The students will apply knowledge and understanding of terms and issues to contexts and actions. This will be achieved through the study of scenarios in various theoretical settings. In all areas of the science curriculum, numeracy and literacy skills will be used and developed in order to expand ideas and formulate conclusions.

The third skill that the students will develop is the ability to analyse and to evaluate a range of evidence relating to theory. This is achieved through exposure to a variety of data and evidence.

KS3 Curriculum

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Autumn Term

Introduction to Science, Particle Models, Separation Techniques and Cells

Movement, Contact forces, Gravity and Energy Costs

Periodic Table, Elements, Breathing and Digestion

Speed, Pressure, Climate and the Earth’s Resources

Atomic Structure and The Periodic Table

Cell Biology

Spring Term

Energy Transfers, Earth Structure and the Universe

Metals and Non-metals, Acids and Alkalis, Variation and Human Reproduction

Work, Heating, Cooling and Evolution

Inheritance, Electromagnets and Magnetism

Energy

Structure, Bonding and Properties of Matter

 

Summer Term

Sound, Light and Interdependence

Plant Reproduction, Voltage, Resistance and Current

Chemical energy, Types of reaction and Wave effects

Wave properties, Respiration and Photosynthesis

Cell Organisation

Electricity

Extra-curricular activities

We aim to supplement our broad curriculum with a range of extra-curricular activities to enrich our students’ experience and enjoyment of learning.

Our STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) club runs every Wednesday lunchtime.  The students undertake a variety of activities and they have the opportunity to achieve the CREST awards. CREST is a scheme that inspires students to think and behave like scientists and engineers.

The ECO club runs once a week after school.  By taking part in this club, the students undertake exciting projects and activities to see how they can contribute to the Earth’s sustainability.

 

Key Stage 4:  Science

Curriculum Intent

The Science Department at Murray Park School aims to ensure that every student is able to understand and critically evaluate any scientific problem they may be faced with in an ever-changing, modern world. Through the courses that we offer, we provide an inspiring range of experiences both in and outside the classroom.

The Murray Park Science Department is committed to ensuring that all students make excellent progress in their Key Stage 4 studies.  We uphold the values of the school and encourage the students to develop their investigatory skills within our subject area.

The Science Department follows the AQA examination courses.

The Combined Science course consists of six exam papers (one hour and fifteen minutes each).

The Triple Science course (Separate Sciences) consists of six exams papers (one hour and forty-five minutes each).  

The students are taught Biology, Chemistry and Physics separately within each topic.

Curriculum Overview

The students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts, terms, and issues in biology, chemistry and physics. This will be achieved through the development of experimental skills and by embedding knowledge that can be described and explained using key words and concepts.

The students will apply knowledge and understanding of concepts, terms and issues to specific contexts. This will be undertaken through studying scenarios in various theoretical settings. In all areas of the science curriculum, the students will use their numeracy and literacy skills to expand ideas and draw conclusions.

During Key Stage 4, the students will analyse and evaluate a range of evidence relating to scientific theory. They will have the opportunity to analyse a variety of data and evidence.

KS4 Curriculum

The students will study the separate sciences pathway or the combined sciences pathway.

 

Year 10

Year 11

Autumn Term

Chemical Quantities and Calculations

Infection and Response

Particle Model of Matter

Genetics

Waves

Variation and Evolution

Chemical Analysis

Spring Term

Chemical Changes

Bioenergetics

Atomic Structure

Energy Changes

The Atmosphere

Ecology in Action

Electromagnetism

Sustainable Development

Space Physics (Separate Science only)

Summer Term

Homeostasis and Response

Forces

The Rates and Extent of Chemical Change

Organic Chemistry

 

Extra-curricular activities

We supplement our broad curriculum with a range of extra-curricular activities to enrich the students’ experiences and enjoyment of learning. In addition to the STEM and ECO clubs, students in Years 10 and 11 are encouraged to attend the Commit to Six after school revision sessions on Mondays and the breakfast sessions. These sessions provide the students with the perfect opportunity to gain additional teacher support in relation to their courses.

Key Stage 3: Spanish

MFL teaching at Murray Park School aims to prepare pupils for the globalised world in which we live. Pupils will be given opportunities to develop their skills in understanding and responding to spoken and written texts; converse in the target language with fluency and accuracy; produce written texts designed for various purposes; use grammatical knowledge to manipulate language effectively; and increase their understanding of other cultures. It is hoped that our pupils will enter leave school with broadened horizons and opportunities that may not have been available to previous generations of their family.

In addition to these aims, which reflect the National Curriculum and GCSE exam specifications, Spanish teachers are keen to be at the forefront of cross-curricular learning across the school, as well as in the areas of literacy, numeracy, SMSC and ICT.

The scheme of learning in MFL is planned to ensure that each module covers content from all three GCSE themes, ensuring that pupils are used to re-using vocabulary and structures in a range of contexts and become accustomed from the outset to the idea that authentic sources and conversation do not fit neatly into categories. Key Stage 3 (KS3) and GCSE vocabulary and structures have been sequenced throughout the five years to ensure that pupils regularly re-use vocabulary and deepen their knowledge of each theme. For example, pupils describe their personality in year 7 modules 1 and 3, before revisiting it with more complex vocabulary in year 9 module 1 in the context of how you get on with family and friends.

In KS3, end of module assessments have been rewritten to adequately prepare pupils for Key Stage 4 study, with pupils taking a productive and a receptive skill each half term, using an abridged format of GCSE examinations.

Homework in MFL takes into account that success in the subject is largely based on the retention of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Pupils are set vocabulary lists and are given differentiated targets for how many words to learn over a half-term. As the word lists directly relate to vocabulary covered in class, this takes the form of flip learning. Pupils are required to review their learning on a regular basis so that they complete retrieval practice based on previous modules.

Curriculum overview

In KS3 Spanish pupils are taught to:

Grammar and vocabulary

  • identify and use tenses or other structures which convey the present, past, and future
  • use and manipulate a variety of key grammatical structures and patterns, including voices and moods, as appropriate
  • develop and use a wide-ranging and deepening vocabulary that goes beyond their immediate needs and interests, allowing them to give and justify opinions and take part in discussion about wider issues
  • use accurate grammar, spelling and punctuation

Linguistic competence

  • listen to a variety of forms of spoken language to obtain information and respond appropriately
  • transcribe words and short sentences that they hear with increasing accuracy
  • initiate and develop conversations, coping with unfamiliar language and unexpected responses, making use of important social conventions such as formal modes of address
  • express and develop ideas clearly and with increasing accuracy, both orally and in writing
  • speak coherently and confidently, with increasingly accurate pronunciation and intonation
  • read and show comprehension of original and adapted materials from a range of different sources, understanding the purpose, important ideas and details, and provide an accurate English translation of short, suitable material
  • read literary texts in the language [such as stories, songs, poems and letters] to stimulate ideas, develop creative expression and expand understanding of the language and culture
  • write prose using an increasingly wide range of grammar and vocabulary, write creatively to express their own ideas and opinions, and translate short written text accurately into Spanish
Year 7
Autumn Term

Give opinions of school subjects

Describe your family

Say what you do with your friends

Say what makes a good friend/ideal date

Discuss healthy living (stress, sleep and relaxation)

Talk about what’s important to you in life

Say what the weather is like

Talk about your part-time job and household chores (how you usually earn money)

Talk about what you receive for Christmas

Say how you celebrate festivals

Spring Term

Describe your personality

Describe your appearance

Describe where places are in town

Say where you go in town

Say what there is in your town/region

Describe your school facilities

Say which sports you do

Ask someone if they want to go out

Describing your home

Give opinions of your holidays

Discuss school rules (uniform in Spanish schools)

Say where you would like to work and why

Summer Term

Say what musical instrument you play

Give your opinion of music

Say what you do online

Say what you wear

Say what you would like to work as

Say when different festivals are

Describe a celebration

Talk about travelling to a festival

Ask for and give directions

Understanding tourist information

Talk about future holiday plans

Say what personality traits you have and whether they would suit a career in tourism

Excitingly, we are currently in the process of introducing Spanish to the school. Pupils can choose between studying French and Spanish in Y7 and then continue with this language until GCSE.

Extra-curricular activities

We aim to convince pupils that language learning should stretch beyond the timetabled lessons. We offer the following opportunities for enrichment in languages:

  • A wide range of international trips to Europe (including Paris / Disneyland and Normandy) and beyond, with a partner school in China
  • Language taster sessions for European Day of Languages and in preparation for trips abroad
  • Language ambassadors who arrange fun-filled events inside and outside Murray Park, including visits to local primary schools to run taster sessions
  • Film screenings of foreign language film to complement study in lessons on cinema
  • Outside visitors, including students extolling the virtues of language study at university and living abroad
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